Pain and Functional Capacity in Female Fibromyalgia Patients

Authors

  • Ana Carbonell-Baeza PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Physical Education and Sport, School of Physical Activity and Sports Sciences
    2. Department of Physical Education and Sport, School of Education Sciences, University of Seville, Spain
    3. Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Unit for Preventive Nutrition, NOVUM, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden
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  • Virginia A. Aparicio BSc,

    1. Department of Physical Education and Sport, School of Physical Activity and Sports Sciences
    2. Department of Physiology, School of Pharmacy, University of Granada
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  • Michael Sjöström MD, PhD,

    1. Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Unit for Preventive Nutrition, NOVUM, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden
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  • Jonatan R. Ruiz PhD,

    1. Department of Physical Education and Sport, School of Physical Activity and Sports Sciences
    2. Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Unit for Preventive Nutrition, NOVUM, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden
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  • Manuel Delgado-Fernández PhD

    1. Department of Physical Education and Sport, School of Physical Activity and Sports Sciences
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  • Disclosure: None.

Ana Carbonell-Baeza, PhD, Departamento de Educación Física y Deportiva, Universidad de Granada, Carretera de Alfacar s/n, Granada 18011, Spain. Tel: +0034 958244375; Fax: +34 958 244 369; E-mail: anellba@ugr.es.

Abstract

Objective.  To examine the association between pain and functional capacity levels.

Desing.  Cross-sectional study.

Setting.  University of Granada.

Subjects.  One hundred twenty-three women with fibromyalgia (51.7 ± 7.2 years).

Outcome Measures.  We measured weight and height, and body mass index (BMI) was calculated. We assessed tender points by pressure pain and functional capacity by means of the 30-second chair stand, handgrip strength, chair sit and reach, back scratch, blind flamingo, 8-ft up and go and 6-minute walk tests.

Results.  We observed an association of tender points count with the chair stand and 6-minute walk tests (r = −0.273, P = 0.004 and r = −0.183, P = 0.046, respectively). These associations became nonsignificant once the analyses were adjusted by weight or BMI. We observed an association of algometer score with the back scratch, chair stand, and 6-minute walk tests (r = 0.238, P = 0.009; r = 0.363, P < 0.001; and r = 0.186, P = 0.043, respectively), which remained after adjusting for weight or BMI, except the association between algometer score and the 6-minute walk test that became nonsignificant once the analyses were adjusted by weight. Prevalence of overweight and obesity was 39.2 and 33.3%, respectively.

Conclusions.  There is an inverse association of tender points count with the chair stand and distance walked in the 6-minute walk tests, and a positive association of algometer score with the chair stand, distance walked in the 6-minute walk and back scratch tests, yet, weight status seems to play a role in these associations.

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