Bilateral intracranial electroencephalographic monitoring immediately following corpus callosotomy

Authors

  • Alyson Silverberg,

    1. Department of Neurosurgery, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, U.S.A.
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  • Kimberly Parker-Menzer,

    1. Department of Neurology, Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, U.S.A.
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  • Orrin Devinsky,

    1. Department of Neurosurgery, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, U.S.A.
    2. Department of Neurology, Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, U.S.A.
    3. Department of Psychiatry, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, U.S.A.
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  • Werner Doyle,

    1. Department of Neurosurgery, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, U.S.A.
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  • Chad Carlson

    1. Department of Neurology, Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, U.S.A.
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Address correspondence to Chad Carlson, Room 1228, HCC12, 530 First Avenue, New York, NY 10016, U.S.A. E-mail: chad.carlson@nyumc.org

Summary

Although many patients with medically refractory focal epilepsy are candidates for resective surgery, patients with multifocal epilepsy and symptomatic generalized epilepsy remain difficult to treat medically and surgically. Corpus callosotomy has been utilized since 1940 for the treatment of seizures, with reports of efficacy in multiple seizure types. Previous studies have demonstrated subsequent lateralization of bilateral/bisynchronous epileptiform activity following callosotomy. To investigate the efficacy of bilateral intracranial electroencephalographic studies immediately following corpus callosotomy, we retrospectively identified 26 patients who underwent corpus callosotomy at our center, 18 of whom had intracranial monitoring following corpus callosotomy. Five of the 18 had focal resections following intracranial electroencephalography (EEG). No patients were seizure free following callosotomy or resection. No differences in postoperative outcomes were seen between patients with intracranial EEG versus those without.

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