Get access

Cutaneous signs of neonatal and infantile immunodeficiency

Authors

  • Nina Mirchandani,

    1. Department of Dermatology, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, New York, NY
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Faris Hawit,

    1. Department of Dermatology, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, New York, NY
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Nanette B. Silverberg

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Dermatology, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, New York, NY
      Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Nanette B. Silverberg, MD, Director of Pediatric Dermatology, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, 1090 Amsterdam Avenue, Suite 11D, New York, NY 10025, (212) 523–3888, Fax: (212) 523–5027, Cell (917) 734–2105, or email: nsilverberg@juno.com.
    Search for more papers by this author

Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Nanette B. Silverberg, MD, Director of Pediatric Dermatology, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, 1090 Amsterdam Avenue, Suite 11D, New York, NY 10025, (212) 523–3888, Fax: (212) 523–5027, Cell (917) 734–2105, or email: nsilverberg@juno.com.

Abstract

ABSTRACT:  Immunodeficiencies frequently present in the skin antepartum and in the first year of life. Although genetic immunodeficiencies are uncommon, the worldwide incidence of the acquired immunodeficiency human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is growing. Early diagnosis and treatment of neonatal immunodeficiencies and associated infections result in improved quality of life and longer life expectancy for these patients. In developed countries, improvements in therapy of HIV during pregnancy have resulted in reduced transmission to the neonate. This article reviews the common presentations and therapy of genetic and acquired neonatal immunodeficiencies.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary