Pediatric atopic dermatitis: should we treat it differently?

Authors

  • Robert Sidbury,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, Division of Dermatology, Children's Hospital and Regional Medical Center, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington
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  • Solmaz Poorsattar

    1. Department of Pediatrics, Division of Dermatology, Children's Hospital and Regional Medical Center, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington
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Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Robert Sidbury MD, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Dermatology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Children's Hospital and Regional Medical Center, 4800 Sand Point Way NE, M2-7, Seattle, WA 98105, or email: robert.sidbury@seattlechildrens.org.

Abstract

ABSTRACT:  Atopic dermatitis is an extremely common childhood skin disease that can have far-reaching impact on patients and families. Pediatric patients, particularly infants, pose special concerns for parents and providers, and equal emphasis must be placed on both nonpharmacologic and prescription interventions. Concerns for adverse effects of prescription therapies and a universal parental fear of an undetected allergy are hallmarks of pediatric atopic dermatitis care. The purpose of the present study is to highlight important educational and therapeutic strategies designed to optimally care for this patient population.

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