Calcium Status and Calcium-Regulating Hormones in Alcoholics

Authors

  • Gunn-Elin Aa. Bjørneboe MD,

    1. National Institute of Forensic Toxicology, Aker University Hospital; Institute of Medical Biochemistry, University of Oslo; and the Ullevål University Hospital; Oslo, Norway.
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  • Anders Bjørneboe MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. National Institute of Forensic Toxicology, Aker University Hospital; Institute of Medical Biochemistry, University of Oslo; and the Ullevål University Hospital; Oslo, Norway.
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  • Jon Johnsen MD,

    1. National Institute of Forensic Toxicology, Aker University Hospital; Institute of Medical Biochemistry, University of Oslo; and the Ullevål University Hospital; Oslo, Norway.
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  • Nina Skylv MD,

    1. National Institute of Forensic Toxicology, Aker University Hospital; Institute of Medical Biochemistry, University of Oslo; and the Ullevål University Hospital; Oslo, Norway.
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  • Helge Oftebro MD,

    1. National Institute of Forensic Toxicology, Aker University Hospital; Institute of Medical Biochemistry, University of Oslo; and the Ullevål University Hospital; Oslo, Norway.
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  • Kaare M Gautvik MD,

    1. National Institute of Forensic Toxicology, Aker University Hospital; Institute of Medical Biochemistry, University of Oslo; and the Ullevål University Hospital; Oslo, Norway.
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  • Arne Høiseth MD,

    1. National Institute of Forensic Toxicology, Aker University Hospital; Institute of Medical Biochemistry, University of Oslo; and the Ullevål University Hospital; Oslo, Norway.
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  • Jørg Mørland MD,

    1. National Institute of Forensic Toxicology, Aker University Hospital; Institute of Medical Biochemistry, University of Oslo; and the Ullevål University Hospital; Oslo, Norway.
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  • Christian A. Drevon MD

    1. National Institute of Forensic Toxicology, Aker University Hospital; Institute of Medical Biochemistry, University of Oslo; and the Ullevål University Hospital; Oslo, Norway.
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Reprint requests: Gunn-Elin Aa Bjφneboe, National Institute of Forensic Toxicology, P. O. Box 16, Gaustad, 0320 Oslo 3, Norway.

Abstract

To elucidate effects of chronic ethanol consumption on clinical chemical parameters reflecting overall calcium homeostasis 34 hospitalized male alcoholics and 35 age-matched controls were studied during the winter season. Serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin Ds were reduced by 28% (p < 0.01) and 24% (p < 0.02) among the alcoholics as compared to the controls, respectively. Dietary intake of vitamin D3 did not differ significantly between the groups. The calcium level was below lower limit of reference in nine alcohdics (26%). Serum concentrations of parathyroid hormone and phosphorus were within normal ranges in both groups, and no differences were observed in levels of magnesium, vitamin D-binding protein, calcitonin, or alkaline phosphatase. In conclusion, it is possible that the activities of enzymes crucial in vitamin D3 metabolism may be altered in alcoholics.

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