Glutamate Receptors in the Frontal Cortex of Alcoholics

Authors

  • Gerhard Freund,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida
    2. Department of Neuroscience, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida
    3. Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Gainesville, Florida
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  • Kevin J. Anderson

    1. Department of Neuroscience, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida
    2. Department of Physiological Sciences, University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine, Gainesville, Florida.
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  • This research was supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health (AA09267). by a grant from the National Institute on Aging (AG08843), by a grant from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (AA09115), and the Medical Research Service of the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Reprint requests: Gerhard Freund, M.D., VA Medical Center (111), 1601 S.W. Archer Road, Gainesville, FL 32608-1197.

Abstract

This study tests the hypothesis that glutamate receptors are altered in the brains of alcoholics as a result of chronic alcohol neurotoxicity. Release of the neurotransmitter glutamate after seizures or brain ischemia may damage postsynaptic neurons by increasing calcium flux through N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-gated ion channels. Alcohol has two opposite effects on glutamate receptor ion channel complexes, depending upon the duration of exposure. Acute exposure to alcohol inhibits ion flow through these receptor- channel complexes, whereas chronic exposure up-regulates the number of these receptors and thereby increases ion flow. Acute withdrawal from alcohol results in hyperexcitability and seizures in the presence of up-regulated channels, thereby making postsynaptic neurons vulnerable to excitotoxic damage. We selected 13 histologically normal brains from alcoholics and 13 brains from controls from our brain bank that were matched for age, postmortem interval, and storage time. Maximal binding and affinities of glutamate receptor subtypes were determined by quantitative autoradiography in the superior frontal cortex, Brodmann area 8. The most alcohol-sensitive subtype, NMDA receptor-channel complexes, were modestly but consistently increased in alcoholics. This included agonist sites (NMDA-sensitive [3H]glutamate), and antagonist site [3H]CGP-39653), and a [3H]MK-801 binding site in the channel interior, although the increase of the latter did not reach statistical significance. Age, autopsy delay, time in storage, liver diseases, thiamine deficiency, CNS medications, and various diseases causing acute and chronic hypoxia did not significantly affect receptor density or affinity. In contrast, the other two glutamate channel subtypes, AMPA and kainate receptors, were not significantly different in alcoholics compared with controls. In conclusion, chronic alcoholism moderately increases the density of the NMDA subtype of glutamate receptors in the frontal cortex. This up-regulation may represent a stage of alcohol-induced chronic neurotoxicity.

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