Psychometric Properties and Validity of the Obsessive-Compulsive Drinking Scale

Authors

  • Michael J. Bohn,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of psychiatry (M.J.B., B.A.B., K.E.B.), University of Wisconsin Medical School; Psychiatry Service and Outpatient Substance Abuse Treatment Program (M.J.B.), William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital; and the Department of Psychology (K.E.B.), University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin
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  • Beth A. Barton,

    1. Department of psychiatry (M.J.B., B.A.B., K.E.B.), University of Wisconsin Medical School; Psychiatry Service and Outpatient Substance Abuse Treatment Program (M.J.B.), William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital; and the Department of Psychology (K.E.B.), University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin
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  • Kenneth E. Barron

    1. Department of psychiatry (M.J.B., B.A.B., K.E.B.), University of Wisconsin Medical School; Psychiatry Service and Outpatient Substance Abuse Treatment Program (M.J.B.), William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital; and the Department of Psychology (K.E.B.), University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin
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  • This study was supported by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Grant R29-AA09948, and by finds from the University of Wisconsin Graduate and Medical Schools.

Psychiatry Service (116A), Department of Veterans Affairs, William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital, 2500 Overlook Terrace, Madison, WI 53705

Abstract

Abstinent alcoholics' self-reports of distressing alcohol-associated thoughts and compulsions to drink were evaluated by the Obsessive-Compulsive Drinking Scale (OCDS). Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses on separate subject samples revealed that subjects' OCDS responses were best described by four correlated dimensions: alcohol obsessions, alcohol consumption, automaticity, and interference due to drinking. The validity of this four-factor solution was supported by the pattern of associations with drinking and coping style measures. In particular, alcohol obsessions were positively associated with alcohol dependence and use of passive/ avoidant coping. Automaticity was positively associated with the intensity and salience of drinking, and inversely associated with use of activefapproach coping. as well as abstinence duration. The obsession and automaticity subscales of the OCDS may be useful in evaluating cognitive-motivational processes associated with recovery from alcoholism.

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