Prediction of Drinking Outcomes for Male Alcoholics after 10 to 14 Years

Authors

  • Barbara J. Powell,

    1. From the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center (B.J.P., J.F.L., P.J.C., T.M.C., B.I.L., J.L.C., T.M.D., M.D.V), Kansas City, Missouri; the Department of Psychiatry (B.J.P., J.F.L., P.J.C., E.C.P., E.J.N., B.I.L., J.L.C.), Kansas University Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas; and Royal Oaks Hospital (A.S.R.), Windsor, Missouri.
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  • Jennifer F. Landon,

    Corresponding author
    1. From the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center (B.J.P., J.F.L., P.J.C., T.M.C., B.I.L., J.L.C., T.M.D., M.D.V), Kansas City, Missouri; the Department of Psychiatry (B.J.P., J.F.L., P.J.C., E.C.P., E.J.N., B.I.L., J.L.C.), Kansas University Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas; and Royal Oaks Hospital (A.S.R.), Windsor, Missouri.
      Reprint requests: Jennifer F. Landon, Ph.D., Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 4801 Linwood Boulevard, Kansas City, MO 64128.
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  • Peggy J. Cantrell,

    1. From the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center (B.J.P., J.F.L., P.J.C., T.M.C., B.I.L., J.L.C., T.M.D., M.D.V), Kansas City, Missouri; the Department of Psychiatry (B.J.P., J.F.L., P.J.C., E.C.P., E.J.N., B.I.L., J.L.C.), Kansas University Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas; and Royal Oaks Hospital (A.S.R.), Windsor, Missouri.
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  • Elizabeth C. Penick,

    1. From the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center (B.J.P., J.F.L., P.J.C., T.M.C., B.I.L., J.L.C., T.M.D., M.D.V), Kansas City, Missouri; the Department of Psychiatry (B.J.P., J.F.L., P.J.C., E.C.P., E.J.N., B.I.L., J.L.C.), Kansas University Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas; and Royal Oaks Hospital (A.S.R.), Windsor, Missouri.
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  • Elizabeth J. Nickel,

    1. From the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center (B.J.P., J.F.L., P.J.C., T.M.C., B.I.L., J.L.C., T.M.D., M.D.V), Kansas City, Missouri; the Department of Psychiatry (B.J.P., J.F.L., P.J.C., E.C.P., E.J.N., B.I.L., J.L.C.), Kansas University Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas; and Royal Oaks Hospital (A.S.R.), Windsor, Missouri.
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  • Barry I. Liskow,

    1. From the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center (B.J.P., J.F.L., P.J.C., T.M.C., B.I.L., J.L.C., T.M.D., M.D.V), Kansas City, Missouri; the Department of Psychiatry (B.J.P., J.F.L., P.J.C., E.C.P., E.J.N., B.I.L., J.L.C.), Kansas University Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas; and Royal Oaks Hospital (A.S.R.), Windsor, Missouri.
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  • Theresa M. Coddington,

    1. From the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center (B.J.P., J.F.L., P.J.C., T.M.C., B.I.L., J.L.C., T.M.D., M.D.V), Kansas City, Missouri; the Department of Psychiatry (B.J.P., J.F.L., P.J.C., E.C.P., E.J.N., B.I.L., J.L.C.), Kansas University Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas; and Royal Oaks Hospital (A.S.R.), Windsor, Missouri.
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  • Jan L. Campbell,

    1. From the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center (B.J.P., J.F.L., P.J.C., T.M.C., B.I.L., J.L.C., T.M.D., M.D.V), Kansas City, Missouri; the Department of Psychiatry (B.J.P., J.F.L., P.J.C., E.C.P., E.J.N., B.I.L., J.L.C.), Kansas University Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas; and Royal Oaks Hospital (A.S.R.), Windsor, Missouri.
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  • Tamara M. Dale,

    1. From the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center (B.J.P., J.F.L., P.J.C., T.M.C., B.I.L., J.L.C., T.M.D., M.D.V), Kansas City, Missouri; the Department of Psychiatry (B.J.P., J.F.L., P.J.C., E.C.P., E.J.N., B.I.L., J.L.C.), Kansas University Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas; and Royal Oaks Hospital (A.S.R.), Windsor, Missouri.
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  • Mary D. Vance,

    1. From the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center (B.J.P., J.F.L., P.J.C., T.M.C., B.I.L., J.L.C., T.M.D., M.D.V), Kansas City, Missouri; the Department of Psychiatry (B.J.P., J.F.L., P.J.C., E.C.P., E.J.N., B.I.L., J.L.C.), Kansas University Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas; and Royal Oaks Hospital (A.S.R.), Windsor, Missouri.
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  • Audrey S. Rice

    1. From the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center (B.J.P., J.F.L., P.J.C., T.M.C., B.I.L., J.L.C., T.M.D., M.D.V), Kansas City, Missouri; the Department of Psychiatry (B.J.P., J.F.L., P.J.C., E.C.P., E.J.N., B.I.L., J.L.C.), Kansas University Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas; and Royal Oaks Hospital (A.S.R.), Windsor, Missouri.
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  • This study was supported by the Medical Research Service, Department of Veterans Affairs, Washington, D.C.

Reprint requests: Jennifer F. Landon, Ph.D., Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 4801 Linwood Boulevard, Kansas City, MO 64128.

Abstract

This study reports on the long-term outcomes of 360 men who were hospitalized for alcoholism during 1980 to 1984 and followed at 12 months and again 10 to 14 years later. At the 10/14-year follow-up, 96 (26.7%) men were confirmed as deceased; 255 (70.8%) men participated in the assessment/interview battery completed during baseline hospitalization. The battery consisted of psychosocial, alcohol-related, and psychiatric measures. Two distinct but highly correlated outcome measures were selected: a clinical rating scale and a factor score. Overall, predictors from baseline and 12-month follow-up included age at intake hospitalization, alcoholism severity, social stability, drinking days, and antisocial personality disorder. Approximately 37% of the assessed survivors were either totally abstinent or drinking nonabusively throughout the 10/14-year follow-up, whereas another 37% continued to drink abusively. Men who abstained or reduced alcohol intake reported better physical health at follow-up than those who continued to drink. Although our findings did not directly link alcoholism to death, they strongly indicate that chronic alcohol abuse may lead to premature death.

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