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Impact of Depressive Symptoms on Future Alcohol Use in Patients with Co-Occurring Bipolar Disorder and Alcohol Dependence: A Prospective Analysis in an 8-Week Randomized Controlled Trial of Acamprosate

Authors

  • James J. Prisciandaro,

    1. From the Clinical Neuroscience Division (JJP, DGB, KTB, BKT), Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina; Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology (SMD, CC), Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina; Ralph H Johnson Veterans Administration Medical Center (KTB), Charleston, South Carolina.
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  • Stacia M. DeSantis,

    1. From the Clinical Neuroscience Division (JJP, DGB, KTB, BKT), Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina; Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology (SMD, CC), Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina; Ralph H Johnson Veterans Administration Medical Center (KTB), Charleston, South Carolina.
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  • Cody Chiuzan,

    1. From the Clinical Neuroscience Division (JJP, DGB, KTB, BKT), Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina; Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology (SMD, CC), Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina; Ralph H Johnson Veterans Administration Medical Center (KTB), Charleston, South Carolina.
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  • Delisa G. Brown,

    1. From the Clinical Neuroscience Division (JJP, DGB, KTB, BKT), Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina; Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology (SMD, CC), Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina; Ralph H Johnson Veterans Administration Medical Center (KTB), Charleston, South Carolina.
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  • Kathleen T. Brady,

    1. From the Clinical Neuroscience Division (JJP, DGB, KTB, BKT), Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina; Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology (SMD, CC), Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina; Ralph H Johnson Veterans Administration Medical Center (KTB), Charleston, South Carolina.
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  • Bryan K. Tolliver

    1. From the Clinical Neuroscience Division (JJP, DGB, KTB, BKT), Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina; Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology (SMD, CC), Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina; Ralph H Johnson Veterans Administration Medical Center (KTB), Charleston, South Carolina.
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Reprints requests: James J. Prisciandaro, PhD, Clinical Neuroscience Division, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, 67 President Street, MSC861, Charleston, SC 29425; Tel.: 843-792-1433; Fax: 843-792-0528; E-mail: priscian@musc.edu

Abstract

Background:  Bipolar disorders and alcohol use disorders commonly co-occur, yet little is known about the proximal impact of bipolar symptoms on alcohol use in patients with this comorbidity. The present study examined the impact of depressive symptoms and alcohol craving on proximal alcohol use in patients with co-occurring bipolar disorder and alcohol dependence.

Methods:  Data were collected during an 8-week randomized controlled trial of acamprosate for individuals with co-occurring bipolar disorder and alcohol dependence (= 30). Depressive symptoms and alcohol craving were assessed biweekly using the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and the Obsessive Compulsive Drinking Scale (OCDS), respectively. Daily alcohol use data were available via administration of the Time-line Follow-back interview at baseline and at subsequent weekly study visits. Correlational analyses and hidden Markov modeling were used to examine the prospective relationships between depressive symptoms, alcohol craving, and alcohol use.

Results:  Depressive symptoms and alcohol craving were significantly correlated with proximal (i.e., 1 week later) alcohol use across a variety of alcohol consumption summary measures. In hidden Markov models, depressive symptoms (OR = 1.3, 95% credible interval = [1.1, 1.5]) and alcohol craving (OR = 1.6, 95% credible interval = [1.4, 1.9]) significantly predicted transitioning from a light to a heavy drinking state, or remaining in a heavy drinking state.

Conclusions:  The results from the present study suggest that depressive symptoms and alcohol craving increase proximal risk for alcohol use in individuals with co-occurring bipolar and alcohol use disorders.

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