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Commentary on Caetano, Mills, and Vaeth (2012): The Role of Context on Alcohol Consumption Among Mexican Americans

Authors

  • Mildred M. Maldonado-Molina,

    Corresponding author
    • Department of Health Outcomes and Policy , Institute for Child Health Policy, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
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  • Chris Delcher

    1. Department of Health Outcomes and Policy , Institute for Child Health Policy, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
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Reprint requests: Mildred M. Maldonado-Molina, PhD, Department of Health Outcomes and Policy, PO Box 100177, Gainesville, FL 32610; Tel.: 352-265-2527; Fax: 352-265-8047; E-mail: mmmm@ufl.edu

Abstract

Background

In this commentary, we discuss a study by Caetano and colleagues (2012) that examines alcohol consumption and binge drinking behavior among U.S.–Mexico border and non-border Mexican Americans using data from the Hispanic Americans Baseline Alcohol Survey.

Methods

We discuss how Caetano and colleagues (2012) addressed 3 gaps in our understanding of drinking behaviors among Hispanics: (1) effects of living near the U.S.–Mexico border, (2) gender differences in drinking behaviors, and (3) alcohol-related outcomes among young women.

Results

Findings suggest that Mexican American men and women living along the U.S.–Mexico border reported higher levels of drinking than their U.S. metropolitan counterparts (Caetano et al., 2012).

Conclusions

This study represents an important contribution to the dearth of studies investigating disparities in alcohol-related consequences among Hispanic young adults living along the U.S.–Mexico border. Future research needs to examine why contextual factors of the U.S.–Mexico border generate differential effects in the Mexican American population.

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