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Moral and Religious Convictions and Intentions to Vote in the 2008 Presidential Election

Authors


Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to G. Scott Morgan, Department of Psychology (M/C 285), University of Illinois at Chicago, 1007 W. Harrison Street, Chicago, IL 60607-7137 [e-mail: gmorga2@uic.edu].

Abstract

The current research investigated whether people's issue-specific moral and religious convictions had distinct or redundant effects on their intentions to vote in the 2008 presidential election. Participants reported their levels of moral and religious conviction about the issue that they perceived as most important to the 2008 presidential election and their intentions to vote. Results indicated that stronger issue-specific moral convictions and weaker issue-specific religious convictions were associated with increased intentions to vote. In short, people's moral and religious convictions had distinct and dissimilar effects on their intentions to vote in the 2008 presidential election.

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