Academic Career Development in Geriatric Fellowship Training

Authors

  • Annette Medina-Walpole MD,

    1. From the *Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatrics and Aging, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, New YorkWarner Center for Professional Development and Education Reform, Margaret Warner Graduate School of Education and Human Development, Rochester, New York.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Judith Fonzi PhD,

    1. From the *Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatrics and Aging, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, New YorkWarner Center for Professional Development and Education Reform, Margaret Warner Graduate School of Education and Human Development, Rochester, New York.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Paul R. Katz MD

    1. From the *Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatrics and Aging, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, New YorkWarner Center for Professional Development and Education Reform, Margaret Warner Graduate School of Education and Human Development, Rochester, New York.
    Search for more papers by this author

  • Portions of this work will be presented in poster and discussion group format at the 2007 annual meeting of the American Geriatrics Society.

Address correspondence to Annette Medina-Walpole, MD, Monroe Community Hospital, 435 East Henrietta Road, Rochester, NY 14620. E-mail: annette_medinawalpole@urmc.rochester.edu

Abstract

Career development is rarely formalized in the curricula of geriatric fellowship programs, and the training of new generations of academic leaders is challenging in the 1 year of fellowship training. To effectively prepare fellows for academic leadership, the University of Rochester's Division of Geriatrics, in collaboration with the Warner School of Graduate Education, created a yearlong course to achieve excellence in teaching and career development during the 1-year geriatric fellowship. Nine interdisciplinary geriatric medicine, dentistry, and psychiatry fellows completed the course in its initial year (2005/06). As participants, fellows gained the knowledge and experience to successfully develop and implement educational initiatives in various formats. Fellows acquired teaching and leadership skills necessary to succeed as clinician–educators in an academic setting and to communicate effectively with patients, families, and colleagues. Fellows completed a series of individual and group education projects, including academic portfolio development, curriculum vitae revision, abstract submission and poster presentation at national meetings, lay lecture series development, and geriatric grand rounds presentation. One hundred percent of fellows reported that the course positively affected their career development, with six of nine fellows choosing academic careers. The course provided opportunities to teach and assess all six of the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education core competencies. This academic career development course was intended to prepare geriatric fellows as the next generation of academic leaders as clinician–teacher–scholars. It could set a new standard for academic development during fellowship training and provide a model for national dissemination in other geriatric and subspecialty fellowship programs.

Ancillary