The Effect of Oral Health on Quality of Life in an Underprivileged Homebound and Non-Homebound Elderly Population in Jerusalem

Authors

  • Avraham Zini DMD, MPH,

    1. From the *Yad Sarah Dental Clinic, Department of Community Dentistry, Hadassah School of Dental Medicine, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel.
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  • Harold D. Sgan-Cohen DMD, MPH

    1. From the *Yad Sarah Dental Clinic, Department of Community Dentistry, Hadassah School of Dental Medicine, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel.
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Address correspondence to Dr. Avi Zini, Department of Community Dentistry, Hebrew University-Hadassah School of Dental Medicine, P.O.B. 12272, Jerusalem 91120, Israel. E-mail: aviz@hadassah.org.il

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To measure the effect of oral health on quality of life in elderly people in Jerusalem and to compare homebound and nonhomebound people.

DESIGN: A cross-sectional, purposive cluster sample.

SETTING: Community-based, one dental clinic, three geriatric day centers, and home visits.

PARTICIPANTS: Three hundred forty-four underprivileged people aged 60 and older, 64 of whom were homebound.

MEASUREMENTS: Score on the shortened version of the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) (validated for Hebrew) was the dependent variable. One dental assistant conducted a structured interview, including universal variables, and one dentist examined dental status.

RESULTS: Average OHIP-14 level was 10.43. For total OHIP-14, the odds ratio comparing the homebound with the nonhomebound population was 2.06 (P=.03). After multiple logistic regression, functional ability and education level reached independent significance for OHIP-14 level were.

CONCLUSION: Homebound elderly people reported greater difficulties than nonhomebound people in communication, eating, relaxation, and life satisfaction as related to oral health.

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