Get access

Learning While Having Fun: The Use of Video Gaming to Teach Geriatric House Calls to Medical Students

Authors

  • Gustavo Duque MD, PhD,

    1. From the *Centre for Medical Education, Nepean Clinical School, University of Sydney, Penrith, New South Wales, AustraliaDivision of Geriatric Medicine§McGill Molson Medical Informatics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, CanadaFaculty of Pharmacy, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Shek Fung MD,

    1. From the *Centre for Medical Education, Nepean Clinical School, University of Sydney, Penrith, New South Wales, AustraliaDivision of Geriatric Medicine§McGill Molson Medical Informatics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, CanadaFaculty of Pharmacy, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Louise Mallet PharmD,

    1. From the *Centre for Medical Education, Nepean Clinical School, University of Sydney, Penrith, New South Wales, AustraliaDivision of Geriatric Medicine§McGill Molson Medical Informatics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, CanadaFaculty of Pharmacy, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Nancy Posel RN,

    1. From the *Centre for Medical Education, Nepean Clinical School, University of Sydney, Penrith, New South Wales, AustraliaDivision of Geriatric Medicine§McGill Molson Medical Informatics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, CanadaFaculty of Pharmacy, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • David Fleiszer MD

    1. From the *Centre for Medical Education, Nepean Clinical School, University of Sydney, Penrith, New South Wales, AustraliaDivision of Geriatric Medicine§McGill Molson Medical Informatics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, CanadaFaculty of Pharmacy, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
    Search for more papers by this author

  • This work was presented at the American Geriatrics Society Annual Meeting, Seattle, Washington, May 2007.

Address correspondence to Gustavo Duque, MD, PhD, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Nepean Clinical School, Level 5, South Block, Nepean Hospital, Penrith, NSW, Australia 2750. E-mail: gduque@med.usyd.edu.au

Abstract

Although most health professionals perform home visits, there is not a structured method for performing them. In addition, in-training health professionals' exposure to home visits is limited for logistical reasons. A new method for medical students to learn how to perform an effective home visit was developed using an instructional video game. It was expected that students would learn the principles of a home visit using a video game while identifying the usefulness of video gaming (edutainment) in geriatrics education. A video game was created simulating a patient's house that the students were able to explore. Students played against time and distracters while being expected to click on those elements that they considered to be risk factors for falls or harmful for the patient. At the end of the game, the students received feedback on the chosen elements that were right or wrong. Finally, evaluation of the tool was obtained using pre- and posttests and pre- and postexposure feedback surveys. Fifty-six fourth-year medical students used the video game and completed the tests and the feedback surveys. This method showed a high level of engagement that is associated with improvement in knowledge. Additionally, users' feedback indicated that it was an innovative approach to the teaching of health sciences. In summary, this method provides medical students with a fun and structured experience that has an effect not only on their learning, but also on their understanding of the particular needs of the elderly population.

Ancillary