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A Randomized, Single-Blind Study of Lansoprazole for the Prevention of Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Older Patients

Authors

  • Takahiko Sasaki MD, PhD,

    1. From the Departments of *Geriatric and Gerontology and §Advanced Preventive Medicine for Infectious Disease, School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai, JapanDepartment of Translational Clinical Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan; and Division of Respiratory Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Jikei University, Tokyo, Japan.
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  • Katsutoshi Nakayama MD, PhD,

    1. From the Departments of *Geriatric and Gerontology and §Advanced Preventive Medicine for Infectious Disease, School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai, JapanDepartment of Translational Clinical Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan; and Division of Respiratory Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Jikei University, Tokyo, Japan.
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  • Hiroyasu Yasuda MD, PhD,

    1. From the Departments of *Geriatric and Gerontology and §Advanced Preventive Medicine for Infectious Disease, School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai, JapanDepartment of Translational Clinical Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan; and Division of Respiratory Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Jikei University, Tokyo, Japan.
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  • Motoki Yoshida MD,

    1. From the Departments of *Geriatric and Gerontology and §Advanced Preventive Medicine for Infectious Disease, School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai, JapanDepartment of Translational Clinical Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan; and Division of Respiratory Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Jikei University, Tokyo, Japan.
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  • Takaaki Asamura MD,

    1. From the Departments of *Geriatric and Gerontology and §Advanced Preventive Medicine for Infectious Disease, School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai, JapanDepartment of Translational Clinical Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan; and Division of Respiratory Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Jikei University, Tokyo, Japan.
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  • Takashi Ohrui MD, PhD,

    1. From the Departments of *Geriatric and Gerontology and §Advanced Preventive Medicine for Infectious Disease, School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai, JapanDepartment of Translational Clinical Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan; and Division of Respiratory Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Jikei University, Tokyo, Japan.
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  • Hiroyuki Arai MD, PhD,

    1. From the Departments of *Geriatric and Gerontology and §Advanced Preventive Medicine for Infectious Disease, School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai, JapanDepartment of Translational Clinical Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan; and Division of Respiratory Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Jikei University, Tokyo, Japan.
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  • Jun Araya MD, PhD,

    1. From the Departments of *Geriatric and Gerontology and §Advanced Preventive Medicine for Infectious Disease, School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai, JapanDepartment of Translational Clinical Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan; and Division of Respiratory Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Jikei University, Tokyo, Japan.
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  • Kazuyoshi Kuwano MD, PhD,

    1. From the Departments of *Geriatric and Gerontology and §Advanced Preventive Medicine for Infectious Disease, School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai, JapanDepartment of Translational Clinical Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan; and Division of Respiratory Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Jikei University, Tokyo, Japan.
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  • Mutsuo Yamaya MD, PhD

    1. From the Departments of *Geriatric and Gerontology and §Advanced Preventive Medicine for Infectious Disease, School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai, JapanDepartment of Translational Clinical Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan; and Division of Respiratory Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Jikei University, Tokyo, Japan.
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Address correspondence to Katsutoshi Nakayama, Division of Respiratory Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Jikei University School of Medicine, 3-25-8 Nishi-shinbashi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-8461, Japan. E-mail: kat_n1@jikei.ac.jp

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy reduces the frequency of common colds and exacerbations in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

DESIGN: Twelve-month, randomized, observer-blind, controlled trial.

SETTING: A university hospital and three city hospitals in Miyagi prefecture in Japan.

PARTICIPANTS: One hundred patients with COPD (mean age ± SD 74.9 ± 8.2) participated. They were all ex-smokers and had received conventional therapies for COPD, including smoking cessation and bronchodilators. Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease or gastroduodenal ulcer were excluded.

INTERVENTION: Patients were randomly assigned to conventional therapies (control group) or conventional therapies plus PPI (lansoprazole 15 mg/d; PPI group) and observed for 12 months.

MEASUREMENTS: Frequency of common colds and COPD exacerbations.

RESULTS: The number of exacerbations per person in a year in the PPI group was significantly lower than that in the control group (0.34 ± 0.72 vs 1.18 ± 1.40; P<.001). The adjusted odds ratio with logistic regression for having exacerbation (≥once/year) in the PPI group compared with the control group was 0.23 (P=.004). In contrast, there was no significant difference in the numbers of common colds per person per year between the PPI group and the control group (1.22 ± 2.09 vs 2.04 ± 3.07; P=.12). PPI therapy significantly reduced the risk of catching frequent common colds (≥3 times/year), the adjusted odds ratio of which was 0.28 (P=.048).

CONCLUSION: In this single-blind, nonplacebo-controlled trial, lansoprazole was associated with a significant decrease in COPD exacerbations. More definitive clinical trials are warranted.

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