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Dear Readers,

In the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Volume 57, Issue 9, pp1719–1721, the letter to the editor entitled, “Professionals' Shared Competences in Multidisciplinary Dementia Care: Validation of a Self-Appraisal Instrument”, the name of the fourth author, Theo van Achterberg, PhD, RN, was inadvertently dropped from the list. The list should be as follows:

Marisol E. Otero, MSc

Irena Drasković, PhD

Scientific Institute for Quality of Healthcare

Alzheimer Center Nijmegen

Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center

Nijmegen, The Netherlands

Ben Bottema, MD, PhD

Department of Primary Care and Public Health

Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center

Nijmegen, The Netherlands

Peter Lucassen, MD, PhD

Department of Primary and Community Care

Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center

Nijmegen, The Netherlands

Saskia Degen, MSc

Theo van Achterberg, PhD, RN

Scientific Institute for Quality of Healthcare

Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center

Nijmegen, The Netherlands

Marcel G.M. Olde Rikkert, MD, PhD

Department of Geriatrics, Alzheimer Center Nijmegen, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands

Myrra J.M. Vernooij- Dassen, PhD

Scientific Institute for Quality of Healthcare, Alzheimer Center Nijmegen

Department Primary and Community Care Center for Family Medicine

Geriatric Care and Public Health

Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center

Kalorama Foundation

Nijmegen, The Netherlands

Also, the correct headings for Table 1 should read as:

Table 1. Composition and Loadings for the Items of Shared Competences in Multidisciplinary Dementia Care
FactorLoadingEigenvalues (% Variance)
1: Dementia patient care (knowledge, attitudes, and skills)
  7.31 (38)
 I recognize the most important symptoms of dementia0.58 
 I consider myself competent in dealing with behavior problems of people with dementia such as apathy and aggression0.70 
 I am able to adapt care to the individual wishes and needs of people with dementia and their informal caregivers0.68 
 I can deal with cognitive limitations of people with dementia0.71 
 I am able to give advice and care for a safe and pleasant home environment0.71 
 I am familiar with the riskful behavior of people with dementia0.70 
 I am able to give as effective care to people with dementia as to0.78 
 other patients
 I understand the problems of people with dementia very well0.53 
 Care for people with dementia is very rewarding0.75 
 I am satisfied with my own performance in caring for people with dementia0.86 
 I have the impression that people with dementia appreciate the care I provide0.75 
2: Interactions with informal caregivers
  2.10 (11)
 I can determine the extent of the informal caregiver's burden0.60 
 I consider myself competent in dealing with informal caregivers' problems caused by care- giving tasks0.79 
 I always take care that I do not interfere with an informal caregiver and his/her family member with dementia0.68 
 I have the impression that informal caregivers appreciate the care I provide0.75 
3: Professional interactions  1.73 (9)
 I have the impression that colleagues appreciate my efforts in dementia care0.64 
 My colleagues are familiar with my expertise in care for people with dementia and their proxies0.45 
 In my work setting, I am encouraged to gather knowledge and skills in the area of dementia care0.72 
 I receive useful tips and advice from colleagues regarding problems that I encounter in caring for people with dementia0.88