Predictors of Lane-Change Errors in Older Drivers

Authors

  • Cynthia A. Munro PhD,

    1. From the *Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Dana Center for Preventive Ophthalmology, Lions Vision Center, Wilmer Eye Institute, §Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, School of Medicine, and #Department of Biostatistics, Bloomberg School of Public Health, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland; and George Institute for International Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
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  • Joan Jefferys ScM,

    1. From the *Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Dana Center for Preventive Ophthalmology, Lions Vision Center, Wilmer Eye Institute, §Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, School of Medicine, and #Department of Biostatistics, Bloomberg School of Public Health, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland; and George Institute for International Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
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  • Emily W. Gower PhD,

    1. From the *Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Dana Center for Preventive Ophthalmology, Lions Vision Center, Wilmer Eye Institute, §Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, School of Medicine, and #Department of Biostatistics, Bloomberg School of Public Health, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland; and George Institute for International Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
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  • Beatriz E. Muñoz MSc,

    1. From the *Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Dana Center for Preventive Ophthalmology, Lions Vision Center, Wilmer Eye Institute, §Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, School of Medicine, and #Department of Biostatistics, Bloomberg School of Public Health, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland; and George Institute for International Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
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  • Constantine G. Lyketsos MD, MHS,

    1. From the *Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Dana Center for Preventive Ophthalmology, Lions Vision Center, Wilmer Eye Institute, §Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, School of Medicine, and #Department of Biostatistics, Bloomberg School of Public Health, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland; and George Institute for International Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
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  • Lisa Keay PhD,

    1. From the *Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Dana Center for Preventive Ophthalmology, Lions Vision Center, Wilmer Eye Institute, §Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, School of Medicine, and #Department of Biostatistics, Bloomberg School of Public Health, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland; and George Institute for International Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
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  • Kathleen A. Turano PhD,

    1. From the *Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Dana Center for Preventive Ophthalmology, Lions Vision Center, Wilmer Eye Institute, §Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, School of Medicine, and #Department of Biostatistics, Bloomberg School of Public Health, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland; and George Institute for International Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
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  • Karen Bandeen-Roche PhD,

    1. From the *Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Dana Center for Preventive Ophthalmology, Lions Vision Center, Wilmer Eye Institute, §Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, School of Medicine, and #Department of Biostatistics, Bloomberg School of Public Health, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland; and George Institute for International Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
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  • Sheila K. West PhD

    1. From the *Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Dana Center for Preventive Ophthalmology, Lions Vision Center, Wilmer Eye Institute, §Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, School of Medicine, and #Department of Biostatistics, Bloomberg School of Public Health, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland; and George Institute for International Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
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Address correspondence to Cynthia A. Munro, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 600 N. Wolfe St., Meyer 218, Baltimore, Maryland 21287. E-mail: cmunro@jhmi.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To determine the factors that predict errors in executing proper lane changes among older drivers.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional analysis of data from a longitudinal study.

SETTING: Maryland's Eastern Shore.

PARTICIPANTS: One thousand eighty drivers aged 67 to 87 enrolled in the Salisbury Eye Evaluation Driving Study.

MEASUREMENTS: Tests of vision, cognition, health status, and self-reported distress and a driving monitoring system in each participant's car, used to quantify lane-change errors.

RESULTS: In regression models, measures of neither vision nor perceived stress were related to lane-change errors after controlling for age, sex, race, and residence location. In contrast, cognitive variables, specifically performance on the Brief Test of Attention and the Beery-Buktenicka Test of Visual-Motor Integration, were related to lane-change errors.

CONCLUSION: The current findings underscore the importance of specific cognitive skills, particularly auditory attention and visual perception, in the execution of driving maneuvers in older individuals.

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