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Keywords:

  • fatigue;
  • aging;
  • nonagenarians;
  • health;
  • mobility limitation

Objectives

To evaluate the prevalence and associated health factors of indoor mobility–related fatigability in nonagenarians.

Design

A cross-sectional observational study of all Danes born in 1905 and assessed in 1998.

Setting

Community, sheltered housing and nursing homes.

Participants

Individuals aged 92 and 93 (N = 1,181) who were independent of help in basic indoor mobility.

Measurements

Fatigability in basic indoor mobility was defined as a subjective feeling of fatigue when transferring or walking indoors. Other standardized assessments include self-report measures of medical history and performance-based assessments of walking speed and maximum handgrip strength.

Results

Twenty-six percent of participants reported fatigability when transferring or walking indoors; fatigability was more common in participants living in sheltered housing (32%) than in those living independently (23%, P < .001). Cardiovascular diseases, musculoskeletal pain, medications, walking speed, and depressive symptoms were independently associated with fatigability.

Conclusion

Fatigability in basic everyday mobility is common in nondisabled nonagenarians. The results also indicate important associations between fatigability and potentially modifiable health factors.