Clinical Results Following Nonoperative Management for Rupture of the Cranial Cruciate Ligament in Dogs

Authors


Abstract

Eighty-five dogs were diagnosed as having rupture of the cranial cruciate ligament. They were managed by restriction of activity to leash walks for 3 to 6 weeks, weight loss if indicated, and analgesic medication as needed. Twenty-four of 28 dogs that had a body weight of 15 kg or less (85.7%) were considered to be clinically normal (no lameness and normal range of motion in stifle, 21 dogs) or improved (3 dogs) after an average follow-up period of 36.6 months. Lameness in the remaining four dogs persisted or worsened over an average period of 8.2 months (minimum 6 months), and surgical replacement of the cruciate ligament was performed. Eleven of 57 dogs that had a body weight of 15 kg or greater (19.3%) were classified as normal (4 dogs) or improved (7 dogs) after an average follow-up period of 49.1 months. Lameness in the remaining 46 dogs persisted or worsened over an average period of 10.2 months (minimum 6 months), and surgical replacement of the cruciate ligament was performed.

Ancillary