Physeal Fractures in the Horse II. Management and Outcome

Authors

  • ROLF M. EMBERTSON dvm ,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.
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  • LARRY R. BRAMLAGE dvm, ms, Dipiomateacvs,

    1. Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.
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  • ALBERT A. GABEL dvm, ms, Dipiomateacvs

    1. Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.
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Rood and Riddle Equine Hospital, P. 0. Box 12070, Lexington, KY 40580.

Abstract

Seventy physeal fractures in horses were initially managed by euthanasia (18), stall confinement (25), application of a cast (7), or internal fixation (20). Of the 52 physeal fractures initially managed with stall confinement, a cast, or internal fixation, 23 (44%) healed and 13 (25%) of these horses became sound. The number of horses less than 4.5 months of age with pressure physeal fractures that became sound was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than the number of horses greater than 4.5 months of age. The number of horses with functional, pain-free limbs (sound horses) or functional limbs (lame horses) was not significantly different (p > 0.05) for Salter-Harris Type I, II, III, or IV pressure physeal fractures; however, critical examination for growth disturbances was not performed. The number of horses with pressure or traction physeal fractures of less than 5 days duration prior to presentation that healed or became sound was not significantly different (p > 0.05) when compared with those horses with fractures of greater than or equal to 5 days duration.

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