A Comparison of Standard Femoral Head and Neck Excision and Femoral Head and Neck Excision Using a Biceps Femoris Muscle Flap in the Dog

Authors

  • F. A. MANN DVM, MS,

    1. Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas.
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  • C. H. TANGNER DVM, MS, DiplomateACVs,

    1. Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas.
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  • C. WAGNER-MANN MA, DVM,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas.
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  • W. K. READ DVM, PhD,

    1. Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas.
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  • D. A. HULSE DVM, MS, DiplomateACVs,

    1. Department of Veterinary Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas.
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  • T. A. PUGLISI DVM, MS,

    1. Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas.
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  • H. P. HOBSON DVM, MS, DiplomateACVs

    1. Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas.
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Department of Small Animal Surgery and Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849.

Abstract

Sixteen normal 20 to 30 kg dogs had standard femoral head and neck excision (8 dogs) or femoral head and neck excision with interposition of a biceps muscle flap (8 dogs). Lameness lessened at week 6, and did not differ between groups; neither group returned to a completely normal gait. Weightbearing decreased on the operated pelvic limb compared to controls (forceplate analysis). Weightbearing force of the muscle flap dogs was significantly less at weeks 6 and 16 than that of the standard femoral head and neck excision dogs. The operated limb of both groups was shortened; shortening was significantly greater for the muscle flap group. Hip extension was limited in both groups. Both groups had decreased (more acute) hip, stifle, and hock angles measured in standing position. Thigh muscle atrophy was more pronounced in the muscle flap group at week 6. More soft tissue was interposed in the muscle flap group at necropsy compared to the group with standard femoral head and neck excision, but the difference was not statistically significant. Skeletal muscle fibers were present in the interposed fibrous connective tissue of the muscle flap group, and the healed surfaces were smoother than those of the standard femoral head and neck excision group.

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