Results of Partial Mandibulectomy for the Treatment of Oral Tumors in 142 Dogs

Authors


DVM, The Animal Medical Center, 510 East 62nd Street, New York, NY 10021

Abstract

Partial mandibulectomy was performed for the treatment of benign or malignant oral tumors in 142 dogs. Forty-two dogs with a benign tumor (ameloblastoma) had a 22.5 month (range, 6 to 74 months) median disease-free interval, with a 97% 1–year survival rate; there was local recurrence in one dog. Twenty-four dogs with squamous cell carcinoma had a disease-free interval of 26 months (range, 6 to 84 months), with a 91% 1–year survival rate; recurrence and metastasis developed in two dogs and metastatic disease in one dog. Based on survival curves, 37 dogs with a melanoma had a median survival time of 9.9 months (range, 1 to 36 months), with a 21% 1–year survival rate; 20 dogs died or were euthanatized for recurrent or metastatic disease. Twenty dogs with osteosarcoma had a median survival time of 13.6 months (range, 3 to 28 months), with a 35% 1 -year survival rate; nine dogs died or were euthanatized for recurrent or metastatic disease. Nineteen dogs with fibrosarcoma had median survival time of 10.6 months (range, 3 to 32 months), with a 50% 1–year survival rate; 12 dogs died or were euthanatized for recurrent or metastatic disease. Results of this and previous studies demonstrated that partial mandibulectomy was effective in prolonging survival and decreasing recurrence for squamous cell carcinoma and ameloblastoma. Progressive disease and corresponding low survival times were common in dogs with melanoma, osteosarcoma, and fibrosarcoma. There were no differences in survival times or the progression of disease among five partial hemimandibulectomy procedures. The high rates of recurrence and metastasis in dogs with these tumors suggest a need for evaluation of ancillary chemotherapy and local radiation therapy to decrease the prevalence of progressive disease.

Ancillary