Popliteal Tendon Transposition for Stabilization of the Cranial Cruciate Ligament Deficient Stifle Joint in Dogs: An Experimental Study

Authors

  • ERIC MONNET DVM, MS, Diplomate ACVS,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Clinical Sciences and the Department of Radiology and Radiation Biology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO.
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  • PETER D. SCHWARZ DVM, MS, Diplomate ACVS,

    1. Department of Clinical Sciences and the Department of Radiology and Radiation Biology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO.
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  • BARBARA POWERS DVM, PhD, Diplomate ACVP

    1. Department of Clinical Sciences and the Department of Radiology and Radiation Biology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO.
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Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80525.

Abstract

Popliteal tendon transposition was performed in five dogs with surgically induced cranial cruciate ligament rupture. After a lateral approach to the stifle joint, the popliteal tendon was severed distal to the sesamoid bone and transposed cranially onto the tibial crest to mimic the sagittal orientation of the cranial cruciate ligament. The origin of the popliteal tendon on the lateral femoral condyle was preserved. Lameness was not clinically detectable 2 months after surgery. At 6 months postoperatively, there was minimal radiographic and histopathologic evidence of degenerative joint disease in the stifle joints that had underwent surgery. There was no gross or microscopic evidence of meniscal damage found at necropsy 6 months after surgery. Biome-chanical studies are warranted before recommending the procedure.

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