Comparisons of Sevoflurane, Isoflurane, and Halothane Anesthesia in Spontaneously Breathing Cats

Authors

  • YOSHIAKI HIKASA DVM, PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Veterinary Surgery, School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, Kitasato University, Towada-shi, Aomori, Japan
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  • HISAHIRO KAWANABE DVM,

    1. Department of Veterinary Surgery, School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, Kitasato University, Towada-shi, Aomori, Japan
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  • KATSUAKI TAKASE DVM, PhD,

    1. Department of Veterinary Surgery, School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, Kitasato University, Towada-shi, Aomori, Japan
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  • SHIGEO OGASAWARA DVM, PhD

    1. Department of Veterinary Surgery, School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, Kitasato University, Towada-shi, Aomori, Japan
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Department of Veterinary Surgery, School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences, Kitasato University, Towada-shi, Aomori 034, Japan.

Abstract

The clinical effects of sevoflurane, isoflurane, and halothane anesthesia with or without nitrous oxide, were compared in healthy, premedicated cats breathing spontaneously during 90 minutes of anesthesia. The effect of nitrous oxide in accelerating the induction of and recovery from anesthesia was more evident for halothane than for sevoflurane or isoflurane. The cats recovered more rapidly from sevoflurane-oxygen than from either halothane- or isoflurane-oxygen. Heart rates did not significantly change during anesthesia with any of the anesthetics. Arterial blood pressures during sevoflurane-oxygen anesthesia were somewhat higher than those with either isoflurane- or halothane-oxygen. There were no significant differences in arterial blood pressures among sevoflurane, isoflurane, and halothane anesthesia when combined with nitrous oxide. The respiration rate during sevoflurane-oxygen was similar to that during halothane-oxygen. There were no significant differences in respiration rate among sevoflurane, isoflurane, and halothane anesthesia when combined with nitrous oxide. The degree of hypercapnia and acidosis during sevoflurane anesthesia was similar to that observed during isoflurane anesthesia and less than during halothane anesthesia. The three anesthetic regimens, with or without nitrous oxide, induced a similar degree of hyperglycemia and hemodilution during anesthesia. Serum biochemical examination did not reveal any hepatic or renal injuries after each anesthesia.

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