Total and Partial Orbitectomy for the Treatment of Periorbital Tumors in 24 Dogs and 6 Cats: A Retrospective Study

Authors

  • M. G. O'BRIEN DVM, Diplomate ACVS,

    Corresponding author
    1. Departments of Clinical Sciences, and Radiological Health Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedica Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO.
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  • S. J. WITHROW DVM, Diplomate ACVS, ACVIM,

    1. Departments of Clinical Sciences, and Radiological Health Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedica Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO.
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  • R. C. STRAW BVSc, Diplomate ACVS,

    1. Departments of Clinical Sciences, and Radiological Health Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedica Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO.
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  • B. E. POWERS DVM, PhD, Diplomate ACVP,

    1. Departments of Clinical Sciences, and Radiological Health Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedica Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO.
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  • J. K. KIRPENSTEIJN DVM, Diplomate ACVS, ECVS

    1. Departments of Clinical Sciences, and Radiological Health Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedica Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO.
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VCA West Los Angeles Animal Hospital, 1818 5 Sepulveda Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90025.

Abstract

Total or partial orbitectomy were used to treat 24 dogs and six cats with invasive periorbital tumors. The surgical procedure and clinical results were evaluated in this retrospective study. The most common types of tumors treated in this series of patients were multilobular osteochondrosarcoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Two patients died of cardiopulmonary arrest within 24 hours after surgery. One patient developed neurological signs after total orbitectomy that resolved with conservative therapy. Minor complications, which included infection, strabismus, and conjunctivitis, occurred in seven patients. Regrowth of tumor in the periorbital region occurred in 11 patients (36.7%). Tumor resection by orbitectomy provided local disease-free interval of more than 1 year in more than 50% of patients. Survival rate for the first year was 70.4% in this series of patients as determined by life table analysis. Orbitectomy requires detailed knowledge of regional anatomy and experience with performing a combination of surgical procedures. Preoperative diagnostic tests should include imaging techniques to define the extent of the disease. When performed properly, orbitectomy is a valuable procedure that can be used to effectively treat invasive tumors of the orbit.

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