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Analgesic Comparison of Meloxicam or Ketoprofen for Orthopedic Surgery in Dogs

Authors

  • Aymeric J. Deneuche DMV, Diplomate ECVS,

    1. From the Sections of Surgery and Anesthesia, Ecole Nationale Vétérinaire d'Alfort, Maisons-Alfort, and Boehringer Ingelheim France, Reims, France.
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  • Cédric Dufayet DMV,

    1. From the Sections of Surgery and Anesthesia, Ecole Nationale Vétérinaire d'Alfort, Maisons-Alfort, and Boehringer Ingelheim France, Reims, France.
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  • Laurent Goby DMV,

    1. From the Sections of Surgery and Anesthesia, Ecole Nationale Vétérinaire d'Alfort, Maisons-Alfort, and Boehringer Ingelheim France, Reims, France.
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  • Pascal Fayolle DMV,

    1. From the Sections of Surgery and Anesthesia, Ecole Nationale Vétérinaire d'Alfort, Maisons-Alfort, and Boehringer Ingelheim France, Reims, France.
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  • Christophe Desbois DVM, DSc

    1. From the Sections of Surgery and Anesthesia, Ecole Nationale Vétérinaire d'Alfort, Maisons-Alfort, and Boehringer Ingelheim France, Reims, France.
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  • Presented at the ECVS 11th annual scientific meeting, Vienna, Austria, July 5–7, 2002.

Address reprint requests to: Aymeric Deneuche, DMV, Résidence la Croix du Sud, Bat A, 120, avenue du Maréchal de Lattre de Tassigny, 94000 Creteil, France. E-mail: adeneuche@free.fr

Abstract

Objective— To compare the safety and efficacy of 2 analgesic protocols (preoperative meloxicam or intraoperative ketoprofen administration) during the first 24 hours after orthopedic surgery in dogs.

Study Design— Double-blind, prospective randomized clinical trial.

Animals— Sixty client-owned dogs.

Methods— Dogs with surgical orthopedic disorders were randomly separated into 2 groups: 30 dogs were administered 0.2 mg/kg meloxicam intravenously (IV) immediately before induction and 30 dogs were administered 2 mg/kg ketoprofen IV, 30 minutes before the end of surgery. Pain was assessed with a visual analog scale (VAS) and a cumulative pain score (CPS) preoperatively and at 30 minutes, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 24 hours after extubation. Selected serum biochemical variables were measured before and 24 hours after surgery and, buccal mucosal bleeding time (BMBT) and whole blood clotting time (WBCT) were measured before and 8 hours after surgery. Dogs were anesthetized with propofol and maintained on halothane in oxygen. Any complications were documented for 7 days after surgery. Results were compared between the 2 groups for significant differences in VAS scores (2-sample t-test) and in CPS (Wilcoxon's 2-sample test). Moreover, results were analyzed for significant differences in area under the curve (AUC) for VAS (2-sample t-test) and CPS (Wilcoxon's 2-sample test) among groups. To assess the effects of treatments on biochemical and coagulation functions, pre- and postoperative mean values of BMBT and WBCT were compared within both treatment groups (paired t-tests) and between both groups (2-sample t-test).

Results— No significant differences in pain response or coagulation were found between meloxicam- and ketoprofen-treated dogs. In both groups, alkaline phosphatase and alanine aminotransferase concentrations were significantly increased compared with baseline. No serious complications occurred.

Conclusions— Preoperative administration of meloxicam is a safe and effective method of controlling postoperative pain for up to 24 hours in dogs undergoing orthopedic surgery.

Clinical Relevance— Analgesia after administration of preoperative meloxicam was comparable with administration of ketoprofen at the end of the surgery.

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