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Mechanical Evaluation of Two Loop Tensioning Methods for Crimp Clamp Extracapsular Stabilization of the Cranial Cruciate Ligament-Deficient Canine Stifle

Authors

  • ANDREW P. MOORES BVSc, DSAS(Orth), Diplomate ECVS,

    1. Departments of Veterinary Clinical Science and Veterinary Basic Sciences, Royal Veterinary College, London, UK.
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  • ALISON L. BECK BVSc(Hons), CertSAS, Diplomate ECVS,

    1. Departments of Veterinary Clinical Science and Veterinary Basic Sciences, Royal Veterinary College, London, UK.
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  • KARIN J. M. JESPERS BSc, MSc,

    1. Departments of Veterinary Clinical Science and Veterinary Basic Sciences, Royal Veterinary College, London, UK.
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  • ALAN M. WILSON BSc, BVMS, PhD

    1. Departments of Veterinary Clinical Science and Veterinary Basic Sciences, Royal Veterinary College, London, UK.
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  • This study was supported by the donation of materials by Securos Inc., Charlton, MA.

Address reprint requests to Andrew Moores BVSc DSAS(Orth) DipECVS MRCVS, Department of Veterinary Clinical Science, Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, North Mymms, Hatfield, Herts AL9 7TA, UK. E-mail: amoores@rvc.ac.uk.

Abstract

Objectives— To describe a method of tightening nylon loops secured with a crimping system for extracapsular fabello-tibial stabilization of the cranial cruciate ligament-deficient stifle and to compare this with a method using a commercially available tensioning device.

Study Design— In vitro mechanical testing.

Methods— Fourteen standardized nylon loops were tensioned using a tensioning device and secured with crimp clamps. Another 14 loops were tightened by partially securing the crimp clamp, followed by tightening of the loop by hand, before definitively securing the crimp clamp. Loops were loaded to failure in a materials testing machine.

Results— Mean ultimate loads for instrument-tightened and hand-tightened loops were 383.7 and 371.4 N, respectively. Mean stiffness values for instrument-tightened and hand-tightened loops were 59.7 and 59.3 N/mm, respectively. These differences were not significant.

Conclusions— The hand tightening method does not affect the mechanical properties of the loop.

Clinical Relevance— The hand tightening method described is a valuable technique for unassisted surgeons without access to tensioning devices.

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