The Effect of Lidocaine on Postoperative Jejunal Motility in Normal Horses

Authors

  • MELISSA MILLIGAN DVM, MS,

    1. Departments of Clinical Sciences and Anatomy and Physiology, the Analytical Pharmacology Laboratory, Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine, Manhattan, KS
    2. Electronics Design Laboratory, Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine, Manhattan, KS
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  • WARREN BEARD DVM, MS, Diplomate ACVS,

    1. Departments of Clinical Sciences and Anatomy and Physiology, the Analytical Pharmacology Laboratory, Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine, Manhattan, KS
    2. Electronics Design Laboratory, Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine, Manhattan, KS
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  • BUTCH KUKANICH DVM, PhD, Diplomate ACVCP,

    1. Departments of Clinical Sciences and Anatomy and Physiology, the Analytical Pharmacology Laboratory, Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine, Manhattan, KS
    2. Electronics Design Laboratory, Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine, Manhattan, KS
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  • TIM SOBERING MS,

    1. Departments of Clinical Sciences and Anatomy and Physiology, the Analytical Pharmacology Laboratory, Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine, Manhattan, KS
    2. Electronics Design Laboratory, Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine, Manhattan, KS
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  • SARAH WAXMAN BS

    1. Departments of Clinical Sciences and Anatomy and Physiology, the Analytical Pharmacology Laboratory, Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine, Manhattan, KS
    2. Electronics Design Laboratory, Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine, Manhattan, KS
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  • Presented in part at the American College of Veterinary Surgeons Symposium, Washington, DC, October 2006.

Address reprint requesst to Dr. Melissa Milligan, DVM, Department of Clinical Sciences, Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine, 1800 Denison Avenue, Manhattan, KS 66506. E-mail: mmilliga@vet.ksu.edu.

Abstract

Objective— To measure the effect of lidocaine on the duration of the migrating myoelectric complex (MMC) and Phases I, II, and III of the MMC, spiking activity of the jejunum, and number of Phase III events when administered postoperatively to normal horses.

Study Design— Nonrandomized cross-over design.

Methods— Horses were anesthetized and via flank laparotomy 4 silver–silver chloride bipolar electrodes were sutured to the proximal jejunum. Electrical activity was recorded for 6 hours during 3 recording sessions beginning 24, 48, and 72 hours postoperatively. Saline (0.9% NaCl) solution was administered for 3 hours followed by lidocaine administration for 3 hours (1.3 mg/kg bolus intravenously [IV], 0.05 mg/kg/min IV constant rate infusion).

Results— Duration of MMC was unchanged during lidocaine administration (77 minutes—saline versus 105 minutes—lidocaine, P=.16). Durations of Phase I and II were unchanged during lidocaine administration (P=.19 and .056, respectively). Phase III was shorter during lidocaine administration (P=.002). Spiking activity was unchanged at all time periods during lidocaine administration (24 hours—P=.10; 48 hours—P=.95; and 72 hours—P=.12). The number of Phase III events was unchanged over all time periods during lidocaine administration (P=.053).

Conclusions— Duration of MMC, spiking activity, and number of Phase III events was unchanged during lidocaine administration.

Clinical Relevance— Use of lidocaine as a prokinetic agent cannot be supported by this study in normal horses; however, results may differ in clinically affected horses.

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