Tibial Tuberosity Advancement for Stabilization of the Canine Cranial Cruciate Ligament-Deficient Stifle Joint: Surgical Technique, Early Results, and Complications in 101 Dogs

Authors

  • SARAH LAFAVER DVM,

    1. Alameda East Veterinary Hospital, Denver, CO and Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, North Grafton, MA
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  • NATHAN A. MILLER DVM, Diplomate ACVS,

    1. Alameda East Veterinary Hospital, Denver, CO and Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, North Grafton, MA
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  • W. PRESTON STUBBS DVM, Diplomate ACVS,

    1. Alameda East Veterinary Hospital, Denver, CO and Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, North Grafton, MA
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  • ROBERT A. TAYLOR DVM, Diplomate ACVS,

    1. Alameda East Veterinary Hospital, Denver, CO and Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, North Grafton, MA
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  • RANDY J. BOUDRIEAU DVM, Diplomate ACVS & ECVS

    1. Alameda East Veterinary Hospital, Denver, CO and Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, North Grafton, MA
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Address reprint requests to Randy J. Boudrieau, DVM, Diplomate ACVS & ECVS, Department of Clinical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, 200 Westboro Road, N. Grafton, MA 01536. E-mail: randy.boudrieau@tufts.edu.

Abstract

Objective— To describe the surgical technique, early results and complications of tibial tuberosity advancement (TTA) for treatment for cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL)-deficient stifle joints in dogs.

Study Design— Retrospective clinical study.

Animals— Dogs (n=101) with CrCL-deficient stifles (114).

Methods— Medical records of 101 dogs that had TTA were reviewed. Complications were recorded and separated into either major or minor complications based on the need for additional surgery. In-hospital re-evaluation of limb function and time to radiographic healing were reviewed. Further follow-up was obtained by telephone interview of owners.

Results— Complications occurred in 31.5% of the dogs (12.3% major, 19.3% minor). Major complications included subsequent meniscal tear, tibial fracture, implant failure, infection, lick granuloma, incisional trauma, and medial patellar luxation; all major complications were treated with successful outcomes. All but 2 minor complications resolved. The mean time to documented radiographic healing was 11.3 weeks. Final in-hospital re-evaluation of limb function (mean, 13.5 weeks), was recorded for 93 dogs with lameness categorized as none (74.5%), mild (23.5%), moderate (2%), and severe (1%). All but 2 owners interviewed were satisfied with outcome and 83.1% reported a marked improvement or a return to pre-injury status.

Conclusions— TTA is a procedure comparable with alternate methods of CrCL repair with expected good to excellent functional outcome.

Clinical Relevance— TTA procedure can be successfully used to obtain the dynamic stability of a CrCL-deficient stifle joint in dogs.

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