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Measurement of Femoral Angles in Four Dog Breeds

Authors

  • JAMES TOMLINSON DVM, MVSci, Diplomate ACVS,

    1. Comparative Orthopaedic Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO
    2. Orthopedic Foundation for Animals, Columbia, MO
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  • DEREK FOX DVM, PhD, Diplomate, ACVS,

    1. Comparative Orthopaedic Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO
    2. Orthopedic Foundation for Animals, Columbia, MO
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  • JAMES L. COOK DVM, PhD, Diplomate ACVS,

    1. Comparative Orthopaedic Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO
    2. Orthopedic Foundation for Animals, Columbia, MO
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  • G. GREG KELLER DVM, Diplomate ACVR

    1. Comparative Orthopaedic Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO
    2. Orthopedic Foundation for Animals, Columbia, MO
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Address reprint request to Dr. James Tomlinson, DVM, MVSci, Diplomate ACVS, University of Missouri, College of Veterinary Medicine, 379 East Campus Drive, Columbia, MO 65211. E-mail: tomlinsonj@missouri.edu.

Abstract

Objective— To develop a standard method of measurement for femoral angles and report values for normal Labrador Retrievers, Golden Retrievers, German Shepherds, and Rottweilers.

Study Design— Retrospective evaluation of canine pelvis and femoral radiographs.

Sample Population— Radiographs of Labrador Retrievers, Golden Retrievers, German Shepherds, and Rottweilers (n=100 for each breed).

Methods— Anatomic lateral distal and proximal femoral angle, mechanical lateral distal and proximal femoral angle, and femoral angle of inclination were measured from radiographs.

Results— For the 4 breeds (Labrador Retrievers, Golden Retrievers, German Shepherds, and Rottweilers, respectively) anatomic lateral distal femoral angles were 97°, 97°, 94°, and 98°; mechanical lateral distal femoral angles were 100°, 100°, 97°, and 100°; anatomic lateral proximal femoral angles were 103°, 98°, 101°, and 96°; mechanical lateral proximal femoral angles were 100°, 95°, 97°, and 93°; and inclination angles were 134°, 134°, 132°, and 137°. Labrador Retrievers, Golden Retrievers, and Rottweilers had significantly higher values for both anatomic and mechanical lateral distal femoral angle than German Shepherds. Anatomic and mechanical lateral proximal angles were greatest for Labrador Retrievers and lowest for Rottweilers.

Conclusion— Anatomic and mechanical femoral joint angles vary between breeds of dogs.

Clinical Relevance— Values for femoral joint angles may be clinically useful for angular limb deformity diagnosis, treatment, and assessment.

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