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Pull-Through Technique for Palmar Digital Neurectomy: Forty-One Horses (1998–2004)

Authors

  • OMAR MAHER DV,

    1. Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, University of California—Davis, Davis, CA
    2. New England Equine Medical and Surgical Center, Dover, NH
    3. Department of Statistics, University of California—Davis, Davis, CA
    4. Myhre Equine Clinic, Rochester, NH
    5. Department of Surgical & Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA
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  • DAVID MICHAEL DAVIS DVM, MS,

    1. Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, University of California—Davis, Davis, CA
    2. New England Equine Medical and Surgical Center, Dover, NH
    3. Department of Statistics, University of California—Davis, Davis, CA
    4. Myhre Equine Clinic, Rochester, NH
    5. Department of Surgical & Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA
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  • CHRISTIANA DRAKE PhD,

    1. Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, University of California—Davis, Davis, CA
    2. New England Equine Medical and Surgical Center, Dover, NH
    3. Department of Statistics, University of California—Davis, Davis, CA
    4. Myhre Equine Clinic, Rochester, NH
    5. Department of Surgical & Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA
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  • GRANT D. MYHRE DVM,

    1. Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, University of California—Davis, Davis, CA
    2. New England Equine Medical and Surgical Center, Dover, NH
    3. Department of Statistics, University of California—Davis, Davis, CA
    4. Myhre Equine Clinic, Rochester, NH
    5. Department of Surgical & Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA
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  • KAREN M. LABBE BS,

    1. Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, University of California—Davis, Davis, CA
    2. New England Equine Medical and Surgical Center, Dover, NH
    3. Department of Statistics, University of California—Davis, Davis, CA
    4. Myhre Equine Clinic, Rochester, NH
    5. Department of Surgical & Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA
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  • JANET H. HAN DVM,

    1. Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, University of California—Davis, Davis, CA
    2. New England Equine Medical and Surgical Center, Dover, NH
    3. Department of Statistics, University of California—Davis, Davis, CA
    4. Myhre Equine Clinic, Rochester, NH
    5. Department of Surgical & Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA
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  • SARAH S. LEJEUNE DVM, Diplomate ACVS & ECVS

    1. Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, University of California—Davis, Davis, CA
    2. New England Equine Medical and Surgical Center, Dover, NH
    3. Department of Statistics, University of California—Davis, Davis, CA
    4. Myhre Equine Clinic, Rochester, NH
    5. Department of Surgical & Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA
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Address reprint requests to Dr. Omar Maher, Large Animal Clinic, Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, UC Davis, Davis, CA 95616. E-mail: omaher@vmth.ucdavis.edu.

Abstract

Objectives— To report outcome of horses treated for navicular syndrome using a pull-through (PT) technique for palmar digital neurectomy (PDN).

Design— Retrospective study.

Animals— Horses (n=41) with navicular syndrome (NS).

Methods— Medical records (1998–2002) for horses that had NS and failed to respond to conservative management that had unilateral or bilateral forelimb, biaxial PDN were reviewed. Outcome for up to 6 years was obtained by telephone questionnaire or lameness examination. Survival analysis was used to assess time to recurrence of lameness.

Results— One year after PDN, 36 horses (88%) were free of lameness. Mean survival with no lameness after surgery was estimated at 4.14±0.33 years (median, 5 years).

Conclusions— PT–PDN technique resulted in soundness for 88% of horses for at least 1 year. PT–PDN was easily and quickly performed without specialized equipment, and had a low incidence of complications.

Clinical Relevance— The PT technique is an effective and viable alternative surgical method for PDN.

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