Get access

Transpalpebral Eye Enucleation in 40 Standing Horses

Authors

  • PATRICK J. POLLOCK BVMS, CertES (Soft Tissue), Diplomate ECVS,

    1. Division of Companion Animal Sciences, Institute of Comparative Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Glasgow, Scotland
    2. Royal Veterinary College, North Mymms, England, and Goulburn Valley Equine Hospital, Congupna, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • TOM RUSSELL BVMS, Diplomate ECVS,

    1. Division of Companion Animal Sciences, Institute of Comparative Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Glasgow, Scotland
    2. Royal Veterinary College, North Mymms, England, and Goulburn Valley Equine Hospital, Congupna, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • THOMAS K. HUGHES MA VetMB, CertES(Ortho),

    1. Division of Companion Animal Sciences, Institute of Comparative Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Glasgow, Scotland
    2. Royal Veterinary College, North Mymms, England, and Goulburn Valley Equine Hospital, Congupna, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • MICHAEL R. ARCHER BVSC, MS, Diplomate ACVS,

    1. Division of Companion Animal Sciences, Institute of Comparative Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Glasgow, Scotland
    2. Royal Veterinary College, North Mymms, England, and Goulburn Valley Equine Hospital, Congupna, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • JUSTIN D. PERKINS BVetMed, MS, CertES (Soft tissue), Diplomate ECVS

    1. Division of Companion Animal Sciences, Institute of Comparative Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Glasgow, Scotland
    2. Royal Veterinary College, North Mymms, England, and Goulburn Valley Equine Hospital, Congupna, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author

  • In addition to the clinics noted some horses had surgery at the Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Copenhagen, Denmark.

  • Presented in part at the British Equine Veterinary Association Annual Symposium, Edinburgh, Scotland 13–15th September 2007.

Address reprint requests to Patrick J Pollock, BVMS, CertES (Soft Tissue), Diplomate ECVS, Weipers Centre for Equine Welfare, Division of Companion Animal Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Glasgow, 464 Bearsden Road, Glasgow, G61 1QH, Scotland. E-mail: p.pollock@vet.gla.ac.uk.

Abstract

Objective— To report a technique for eye enucleation in standing sedated horses and to report outcome in 40 horses.

Study Design— Retrospective study.

Animals— Horses (n=40) requiring eye enucleation.

Methods— The eye was enucleated using a transpalpebral technique in 40 horses restrained in stocks and sedated. Anesthesia of orbital structures was provided by local nerve blocks and infiltration of the surgical site with local anesthetic solution.

Results— Affected eyes were successfully enucleated with the horse standing. Short-term complications included moderate swelling (5 horses) and wound discharge (1). Long-term complications were not observed.

Conclusions— A diseased eye can be safely enucleated with a horse standing.

Clinical Relevance— Enucleating an equine eye in the standing position eliminates the risks and costs of general anesthesia.

Ancillary