Oncologic Outcome after Curative-Intent Treatment in 39 Dogs with Primary Chest Wall Tumors (1992–2005)

Authors

  • JULIUS M. LIPTAK BVSc, MVetClinStud, FACVSc, Diplomate ACVS & ECVS,

    1. Animal Cancer Center and Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO
    2. Department of Clinical Studies, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada
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  • DEBRA A. KAMSTOCK DVM, PhD, Diplomate ACVP,

    1. Animal Cancer Center and Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO
    2. Department of Clinical Studies, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada
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  • WILLIAM S. DERNELL DVM, MS, Diplomate ACVS,

    1. Animal Cancer Center and Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO
    2. Department of Clinical Studies, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada
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  • GABRIELLE J. MONTEITH BSc,

    1. Animal Cancer Center and Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO
    2. Department of Clinical Studies, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada
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  • SCOTT A. RIZZO BS, MS, DVM,

    1. Animal Cancer Center and Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO
    2. Department of Clinical Studies, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada
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  • STEPHEN J. WITHROW DVM, Diplomate ACVS & ACVIM (Oncology)

    1. Animal Cancer Center and Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO
    2. Department of Clinical Studies, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada
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Address reprint requests to Julius M. Liptak, BVSc, MVetClinStud, Alta Vista Animal Hospital, 2616 Bank Street, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1T 1M9. E-mail: juliusliptak@mac.com.

Abstract

Objective— To describe the clinical features and determine oncologic outcome and prognostic factors for dogs with primary tumors of the osseous chest wall.

Study Design— Historical cohort.

Animals— Dogs (n=39) with spontaneous tumors involving the chest wall.

Methods— Medical records were reviewed for dogs with rib and/or sternal tumors treated by chest wall resection and reconstruction. Signalment, preoperative clinical features, reconstruction technique, and oncologic outcome (local tumor recurrence, metastasis, and survival time) were determined from medical records and by telephone contact with owners and referring veterinarians. Oncologic outcome and prognostic factors were determined using Kaplan–Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazards. Logistic regression was used to determine if increased serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) concentration was associated with tumor type.

Results— Of the 39 dogs with tumors arising from the chest wall, 25 had osteosarcoma, 12 had chondrosarcoma, and 2 dogs had hemangiosarcoma. Median survival time (MST) for dogs with rib osteosarcoma was 290 days. Increased activity of total ALP significantly decreased survival in dogs with osteosarcoma (210 days versus 675 days, P=.0035). MST for dogs with rib chondrosarcoma was not reached (mean 1301 days) and survival was significantly greater than all other types of rib tumors (P=.0321).

Conclusion— Rib tumors should be resected with wide margins to decrease the risk of incomplete excision, because local tumor recurrence has a significant impact on the survival time. The prognosis for dogs with rib chondrosarcoma is very good, but guarded for other types of tumors.

Clinical Relevance— Osteosarcoma and chondrosarcoma are the most common primary tumors of the chest wall. Prognosis for dogs with primary rib chondrosarcoma is very good with surgery alone, but surgery and adjunctive chemotherapy is recommended for dogs with primary rib osteosarcoma and the prognosis remains guarded.

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