Laparoscopic Mesh Incisional Hernioplasty in Five Horses

Authors

  • JOHN P. CARON DVM, MVSc, Diplomate ACVS,

    1. Departments of Large Animal Clinical Sciences and Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI
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  • STEVEN J. MEHLER DVM, Diplomate ACVS

    1. Departments of Large Animal Clinical Sciences and Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI
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  • Funded in part by the American College of Veterinary Surgeons and Davol Inc.
    Presented in part at the 4th Annual Conference of the Veterinary Endoscopy Society, Duck Key, FL, March 2007, and the British Equine Veterinary Association Congress, Edinburgh, Scotland, September 2007.

Address reprint requests to Dr. John P. Caron, DVM, MVSc, Diplomate ACVS, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, G-351 VMC, East Lansing, MI 48824. E-mail: caron@cvm.msu.edu.

Abstract

Objective— To report a technique for incisional hernioplasty in horses using laparoscopic placement of a prosthetic mesh.

Study Design— Case series.

Animals— Horses (n=5) with ventral median abdominal incisional hernia.

Methods— A telescope and 2 instrument portals were established bilaterally, lateral to and distant from the hernia margins. After exposure of the internal rectus sheath by removal of retroperitoneal fat with endoscopic scissors and monopolar cautery, a prosthetic mesh was introduced into the abdomen and secured intraperitoneally using transfascial sutures with or without supplemental endoscopic hernia fixation devices.

Results— Successful placement of the prostheses was achieved without major intra- or postoperative complications. Repairs were intact in all horses (follow-up range: 6–23 months) without evidence of adhesion formation. Cosmetic results compared favorably with those typically achieved using conventional, open hernioplasty techniques.

Conclusion— Incisional hernia repair in horses can be successfully achieved with a laparoscopic intraperitoneal mesh onlay technique.

Clinical Relevance— Laparoscopic mesh hernioplasty has promise as a safe and effective method for repair of incisional hernias in horses.

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