Get access

Sinoscopic Treatment of Rostral Maxillary and Ventral Conchal Sinusitis in 60 Horses

Authors

  • JUSTIN D. PERKINS BVetMed, MS, Cert ES (Soft Tissue), Diplomate ECVS,

    1. Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Royal Veterinary College, North Mymms and the Department of Veterinary Clinical Studies, Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, Easter Bush, UK
    Search for more papers by this author
  • ZOË WINDLEY BVetMed (Hons),

    1. Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Royal Veterinary College, North Mymms and the Department of Veterinary Clinical Studies, Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, Easter Bush, UK
    Search for more papers by this author
  • PADRAIC M. DIXON MVB, PhD,

    1. Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Royal Veterinary College, North Mymms and the Department of Veterinary Clinical Studies, Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, Easter Bush, UK
    Search for more papers by this author
  • MATTHEW SMITH BVetMed, Cert ES(Orth), Diplomate ECVS,

    1. Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Royal Veterinary College, North Mymms and the Department of Veterinary Clinical Studies, Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, Easter Bush, UK
    Search for more papers by this author
  • SAFIA Z. BARAKZAI BVM&S, MSc, DESTS, Diplomate ECVS

    1. Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Royal Veterinary College, North Mymms and the Department of Veterinary Clinical Studies, Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, Easter Bush, UK
    Search for more papers by this author

  • Dr. Smith's current address is Newmarket Equine Hospital, Cambridge Road, Newmarket, Suffolk CB8 0FG, UK

Address reprint requests to Justin Perkins, BVetMed, MS, Cert ES (Soft Tissue), Diplomate ECVS, Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, North Mymms, Hatfield, Hertfordshire AL9 7TA, UK. E-mail: jperkins@rvc.ac.uk

Abstract

Objective— To evaluate the use of sinoscopy for detection and treatment of ventral conchal sinus (VCS) and/or rostral maxillary sinus (RMS) disease in horses.

Study Design— Case series

Animals— Horses (n=60) with suspected paranasal sinus disease.

Methods— Horses were evaluated by sinoscopy through a conchofrontal sinus (CFS) portal with ventral conchal bulla (VCB) fenestration. Other endoscopic sinus approaches and adjunctive diagnostic tests; oral examination, computed tomography, radiography, scintigraphy and endoscopic examination of the upper portion of the respiratory tract were used in some horses.

Results— The CFS approach permitted adequate observation of the RMS and VCS in 53 horses (88%). Hemorrhage caused by VCB fenestration prevented examination of the RMS and/or VCS in 12 horses (21%). Observation of lesions was possible in all horses diagnosed with neoplasia, sinus cysts, and progressive ethmoidal hematomas. Endoscopy of the paranasal sinuses was useful diagnostically in 82% of horses with primary sinusitis. Other diagnostic modalities were usually required to confirm a diagnosis of dental sinusitis.

Conclusions— Trephination into the CFS with VCB fenestration is a minimally invasive technique that provides consistent access to the RMS and VCS. It facilitates diagnosis of many sinus disorders and endoscopically guided treatment of many horses with sinus cysts and primary sinusitis, in combination with sinus lavage.

Clinical Relevance— Many diseases affecting the RMS and VCS can be diagnosed and resolved endoscopically using a CFS approach with VCB fenestration, thus avoiding the need for osteoplastic sinus surgery and its associated risks and complications.

Ancillary