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Contact Mechanics of Simulated Meniscal Tears in Cadaveric Canine Stifles

Authors

  • KELLEY M. THIEMAN DVM,

    1. Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and the Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, College of Medicine, University of Florida Veterinary Medical Center, Gainesville, FL.
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  • ANTONIO POZZI DMV, MS, Diplomate ACVS,

    1. Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and the Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, College of Medicine, University of Florida Veterinary Medical Center, Gainesville, FL.
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  • HANG-YIN LING PhD,

    1. Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and the Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, College of Medicine, University of Florida Veterinary Medical Center, Gainesville, FL.
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  • DANIEL D. LEWIS DVM, Diplomate ACVS,

    1. Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and the Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, College of Medicine, University of Florida Veterinary Medical Center, Gainesville, FL.
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  • MARYBETH HORODYSKI EdD, ATC

    1. Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and the Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, College of Medicine, University of Florida Veterinary Medical Center, Gainesville, FL.
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  • This work was performed at the University of Florida Comparative Orthopaedics and Biomechanics Laboratory.

  • Supported by a grant from the University of Florida Faculty Advancement Fund.

Corresponding author: Dr. Antonio Pozzi, DMV, MS, Diplomate ACVS, Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, College of Medicine, University of Florida Veterinary Medical Center, 2015 SW, 16th Avenue Gainesville, FL 32610. E-mail: Pozzia@vetmed.ufl.edu.

Abstract

Objective— To evaluate the biomechanical effects of 5 types of meniscal lesions on contact mechanics in the canine stifle.

Study Design— Experimental study.

Animals— Cadaveric canine stifles (n=12 pair).

Methods— Medial meniscal lesions (radial, vertical longitudinal, nonreducible bucket handle, flap, and complex tears) were simulated in cadaveric stifles. A contact map was recorded from each tear type and contact area (CA) and peak contact pressure (PCP) from each tear type were compared.

Results— A significant difference in PCP was detected between control and nonreducible bucket handle, flap, and complex tears. PCP increased by >45% in nonreducible bucket handle, flap, and complex meniscal tears when compared with control. No significant difference was found in PCP between control and radial and vertical longitudinal tears. No significant difference was found in CA between any of the meniscal conditions.

Conclusions— Nonreducible bucket handle, flap, and complex tears cause a significant increase in PCP. Radial and vertical longitudinal tears had a minimal impact on the contact pressures of the medial compartment of the stifle.

Clinical Relevance— Based on this ex vivo model, we support the clinical recommendation of debriding nonreducible bucket handle, flap, and complex tears because the injured portion of the meniscus no longer contributes significantly to the function of the meniscus. Radial and vertical longitudinal tears do not cause a change in contact mechanics allowing consideration of nonsurgical treatment and meniscal repair, respectively. Future experimental and clinical studies should aim to refine the treatment of specific meniscal injuries.

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