Get access

Hypophosphatemia in Cats After Renal Transplantation

Authors

  • ERIN R. PASTER DVM, Diplomate ACVS,

    1. William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, and the Departments of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, and Population Health and Reproduction, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • MARGO L. MEHL DVM, Diplomate ACVS,

    1. William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, and the Departments of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, and Population Health and Reproduction, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • PHILIP H. KASS DVM, PhD, Diplomate ACVPM,

    1. William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, and the Departments of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, and Population Health and Reproduction, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • CLARE R. GREGORY DVM, Diplomate ACVS

    1. William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, and the Departments of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, and Population Health and Reproduction, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA.
    Search for more papers by this author

  • Presented in part at the Annual American College of Veterinary Surgeons Veterinary Symposium, Chicago, IL, October 17–21, 2007.

  • Dr. Mehl's present address is San Francisco Veterinary Specialists, 600 Alabama, San Francisco, CA 94110.

  • Dr. Clare Gregory's present address is Pet Care Veterinary Hospital, 1370 Fulton Road, Santa Rosa, CA 95401.

Corresponding author: Dr. Erin Paster, DVM, Diplomate ACVS, Northern California Veterinary Specialists, 7425 Greenhaven Road Sacramento, CA 95831. E-mail: erinpaster@vmth.ucdavis.edu.

Abstract

Objective— To report the prevalence of hypophosphatemia after renal transplantation in a historical cohort of cats.

Design— Case series.

Animals— Cats (n=86) that received a renal allograft.

Methods— Medical records (January 200–June 2006) were reviewed. Signalment, clinical signs, pre- and postoperative diet, pre- and postoperative clinicopathologic variables, renal histopathology, and outcome were retrieved. Prevalence, onset, duration, treatment and associated clinical signs of hypophosphatemia were recorded. A χ2 test was used to compare hemolysis frequency between cats with normal serum phosphorus concentration or a single spurious low serum phosphorus concentration for <24 hours duration (group 1) and confirmed hypophosphatemia for >24 hours (group 2). A Cox proportional hazards model was used to evaluate the effects of hypophosphatemia on survival while controlling for other potentially confounding variables (age, sex, weight, body condition score, and pre- and 24 hours postoperative clinicopathologic variables).

Results— Eighty-six cats (mean age, 7.7 years) were identified. Hypophosphatemia occurred in 32 cats (37%), with a median onset of 2 days and median duration of 4 days. Treatment was initiated in 48 (56%) of hypophosphatemic cats. Survival and hemolysis frequency was not significantly different between groups, and no risk factors were identified.

Conclusion— Hypophosphatemia occurs in cats after renal transplantation and does not affect survival.

Clinical Relevance— The clinical importance of hypophosphatemia in renal transplant recipients remains unknown.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary