Use of Propofol–Xylazine and the Anderson Sling Suspension System for Recovery of Horses from Desflurane Anesthesia

Authors

  • EUGENE P. STEFFEY VMD, PhD, Diplomate ACVA & ECVA,

    1. Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA
    2. KL Maddy Equine Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA
    3. Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO.
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  • ROBERT J. BROSNAN DVM, PhD, Diplomate ACVA,

    1. Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA
    2. KL Maddy Equine Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA
    3. Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO.
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  • LARRY D. GALUPPO DVM, Diplomate ACVS,

    1. Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA
    2. KL Maddy Equine Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA
    3. Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO.
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  • KHURSHEED R. MAMA DVM, Diplomate ACVA,

    1. Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA
    2. KL Maddy Equine Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA
    3. Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO.
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  • AYAKO IMAI DVM, MS,

    1. Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA
    2. KL Maddy Equine Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA
    3. Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO.
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  • LARA K. MAXWELL DVM, PhD, Diplomate ACVCP,

    1. Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA
    2. KL Maddy Equine Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA
    3. Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO.
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  • CYNTHIA A. COLE DVM, PhD, Diplomate ACVCP,

    1. Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA
    2. KL Maddy Equine Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA
    3. Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO.
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  • SCOTT D. STANLEY PhD

    1. Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA
    2. KL Maddy Equine Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA
    3. Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO.
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  • Presented in part at the 8th World Congress of Veterinary Anesthesia, Knoxville, TN, September 19, 2003 (Vet Anaesth Analg 31:45–46, 2004 [abstr]).

  • Supported by the School of Veterinary Medicine Center for Equine Health with funds provided by the Oak Tree Racing Association, the State of California satellite wagering fund and contributions by private donors, and by a donation of desflurane and propofol by Baxter Health Care.

  •  There is no known conflict of interest by any of the authors related to the drug or sling products reported in this manuscript.

  • Dr. Imai's current address is Department of Anesthesia, Japan Animal Referral Medical Center, 2-5-8 Kuji, Takatsu-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 213-0032, Japan.

  • Dr. Maxwell's current address is Department of Physiological Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078.

  • Dr. Cole's current address is Professional Services Group, IDEXX Pharmaceuticals Inc., Greensboro, NC 27410.

Corresponding author: EP Steffey, VMD, PhD, Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616. E-mail: epsteffey@ucdavis.edu.

Abstract

Objective— To characterize the behavior of horses recovering in the Anderson Sling Suspension System after 4 hours of desflurane anesthesia and postdesflurane intravenous (IV) administration of propofol and xylazine.

Study Design— Experimental study.

Animals— Healthy horses (n=6), mean±SEM age 12.3±1.8 years; mean weight 556±27 kg.

Methods— Each horse was anesthetized with xylazine, diazepam, and ketamine IV and anesthesia was maintained with desflurane in O2. At the end of 4 hours of desflurane, each horse was positioned in the sling suspension system and administered propofol–xylazine IV. Recovery events were quantitatively and qualitatively assessed. Venous blood was obtained before and after anesthesia for biochemical and propofol analyses.

Results— Anesthetic induction and maintenance were without incident. Apnea commonly accompanied propofol administration. All horses had consistent recovery behavior characterized by a smooth, careful, atraumatic return to a standing posture.

Conclusions— Results of this study support careful, selective clinical use of desflurane, propofol–xylazine, and the Anderson Sling Suspension System to atraumatically transition horses with high anesthetic recovery risk to a wakeful standing posture.

Clinical Relevance— Technique choices to facilitate individualized, atraumatic recovery of horses from general anesthesia are desirable. Use of IV propofol and xylazine to transition horses from desflurane anesthesia during sling recovery to standing posture may facilitate improved recovery management of high-injury risk equine patients requiring general anesthesia.

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