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Resection and Anastomosis of the Descending Colon in 43 Horses

Authors

  • Timo Prange Dr med vet,

    1. Departments of Large Animal Clinical Sciences and Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI
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  • Susan J. Holcombe VMD, PhD, Diplomate ACVS & ACVECC,

    1. Departments of Large Animal Clinical Sciences and Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI
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  • Jennifer A. Brown DVM, Diplomate ACVS,

    1. Marion DuPont Scott Equine Medical Center, Leesburg, VA
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  • Julie E. Dechant DVM, MS, Diplomate ACVS,

    1. Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA
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  • Susan L. Fubini DVM, Diplomate ACVS,

    1. Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
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  • Rolf M. Embertson DVM, Diplomate ACVS,

    1. Rood and Riddle Equine Hospital, Lexington, KY
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  • John Peroni DVM, MS, Diplomate ACVS,

    1. Department of Large Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA
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  • Peter C. Rakestraw VMD, MA, Diplomate ACVS,

    1. Department of Large Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX
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  • Joe G. Hauptman DVM, MS, Diplomate ACVS

    1. Departments of Large Animal Clinical Sciences and Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI
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  • Presented in part at the ACVS Symposium 2008, San Diego, CA (Vet Surg 37:E 26, 2008 [abstract]).

Corresponding Author
Timo Prange, Dr med vet, Departments of Large Animal Clinical Sciences and of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824
E-mail: prangeti@cvm.msu.edu

Abstract

Objectives: To determine (1) the short- (to hospital discharge) and long- (>6 months) term survival, (2) factors associated with short-term survival, and (3) the perioperative course for horses with resection and anastomosis of the descending colon.

Study Design: Multicentered case series.

Animals: Horses (n=43) that had descending colon resection and anastomosis.

Methods: Medical records (January 1995–June 2009) of 7 equine referral hospitals were reviewed for horses that had descending colon resection and anastomosis and were recovered from anesthesia. Retrieved data included history, results of clinical and clinicopathologic examinations, surgical findings, postsurgical treatment and complications, and short-term survival (hospital discharge). Long-term survival was defined as survival ≥6 months after hospital discharge.

Results: Of 43 horses, 36 (84%) were discharged from the hospital. Twenty-eight of 30 horses with follow-up information survived ≥6 months. No significant associations between perioperative factors and short-term survival were identified. Lesions included strangulating lipoma (n=27), postfoaling trauma (4), infarction (4), intraluminal obstruction (2), and other (6). Common postoperative complications included fever and diarrhea. During hospitalization 7 horses were euthanatized or died because of septic peritonitis (3), endotoxemia (3), and colic and ileus (1).

Conclusions: Descending colon resection and anastomosis has a favorable prognosis for hospital discharge and survival ≥6 months. The most common cause of small colon incarceration was strangulating lipoma.

Clinical Relevance: Complications include postoperative fever and diarrhea but the prognosis is good after small colon resection and anastomosis.

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