Get access

Right Intercostal Insertion of a Veress Needle for Laparoscopy in Dogs

Authors

  • Valentina Fiorbianco DVM,

    1. Clinic for Small Animal Surgery, Ophthalmology, Dentistry, Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation, Department of Small Animals and Horses, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Monika Skalicky DTPH,

    1. Institute of Pathophysiology, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Vienna, Austria
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Judith Doerner DVM,

    1. Clinic for Small Animal Surgery, Ophthalmology, Dentistry, Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation, Department of Small Animals and Horses, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Murat Findik DVM, Prof,

    Prof
    1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ondokuz Mayıs University, Samsun, Turkey
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Gilles Dupré DVM, Prof, Diplomate ECVS

    Corresponding author
    • Clinic for Small Animal Surgery, Ophthalmology, Dentistry, Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation, Department of Small Animals and Horses, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria
    Search for more papers by this author

  • Study performed at the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna and at the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ondokuz Mayıs University, Turkey

Corresponding Author

Gilles Dupré, DVM, Prof., Diplomate ECVS, Department of Small Animals and Horses, Clinic for Small Animal Surgery, Ophthalmology, Dentistry, Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Veterinaerplatz 1, A-1210, Vienna, Austria

E-mail: gilles.dupre@vetmeduni.ac.at

Abstract

Objective

To evaluate right intercostal Veress needle (VN) insertion for laparoscopy in dogs.

Study Design

Longitudinal cohort study.

Animals

Female dogs (n = 56).

Methods

The VN was inserted in the last palpable right intercostal space, either 1/3 (Group T; 28 dogs) or mid distance (Group H; 28 dogs) from the xiphoid cartilage to the most caudal extent of the costal arch. Problems encountered during VN insertion and injuries were recorded, graded, and compared between groups, and also between the first and last 20 insertions.

Results

Pneumoperitoneum was successfully achieved by VN insertion in 49 (88%) dogs after a single (45 dogs) or 2nd attempt (4 dogs). Frequency of complications was as follows: 20 grade 1 (subcutaneous emphysema, omentum, or falciform injuries); 6 grade 2 (liver or spleen injury), and 1 grade 3 complication (pneumothorax occurred). No significant difference was found between the 2 groups or between the first and last 20 dogs.

Conclusions

Right intercostal VN insertion facilitates pneumoperitoneum in dogs with few consequential complications. No significant difference was found between entry sites; however, the mid distance insertion site in the last palpable intercostal space with dog positioned in dorsal recumbency is likely to result in less complications.

Ancillary