Indwelling Cephalic or Saphenous Vein Catheter Use for Regional Limb Perfusion in 44 Horses with Synovial Injury Involving the Distal Aspect of the Limb

Authors

  • Gal Kelmer DVM, MS, Diplomate ACVS & ECVS,

    Corresponding author
    • Department of Large Animal Medicine and Surgery, Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, The Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel
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  • Amos Tatz DVM,

    1. Department of Large Animal Medicine and Surgery, Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, The Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel
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  • Tali Bdolah-Abram Msc

    1. Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel
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Corresponding Author

Gal Kelmer, DVM, Department of Large Animal Medicine and Surgery, Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, PO Box 12, Rehovot 76100, Israel

E-mail: galkelmer@hotmail.com

Abstract

Objective

To describe indwelling cephalic or saphenous vein catheter use for intravenous regional limb perfusion (ID-IV-RLP) to treat horses with synovial injury (contamination/infection) of the distal aspect of the limb.

Study Design

Retrospective case series.

Animals

Horses (n = 44; 45 limbs) treated with proximal ID-IV-RLP.

Methods

Horses had ID-IV-RLP using a cephalic (21 limbs) or saphenous (24 limbs) vein. Amikacin was the most frequently used antibiotic. Number of perfusions ranged from 3 to 21 (median 7). A cast was applied to 14 injured limbs (1 tube cast, 1 full-limb cast, 2 foot casts, and 10 half-limb casts).

Results

Synovial sepsis of the distal portion of 87% of limbs (39) resolved, and 61% of horses returned to soundness. Catheter-related complications occurred in 27% of the limbs but were not significantly associated with outcome. Presence of osteomyelitis was significantly associated with a poor outcome.

Conclusions

ID-IV-RLP using the cephalic or saphenous vein is an alternative to traditional RLP. An indwelling catheter provided prolonged venous access and facilitated successive perfusions.

Ancillary