Laparoscopic Sterilization of the African Lioness (Panthera leo)

Authors

  • Marthinus J. Hartman BVSc,

    Corresponding author
    • Department of Companion Animal Clinical Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Eric Monnet PhD Diplomate ACVS & ECVS,

    1. Department of Clinical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Robert M. Kirberger MMedVet (Rad) Diplomate ECVDI,

    1. Department of Companion Animal Clinical Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Leon J. Venter BVSc,

    1. Department of Paraclinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Lynette Bester MMedVet (Anaes),

    1. Department of Companion Animal Clinical Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Martin L. Schulman MMedVet (Gyn),

    1. Department of Production Animal Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Tania Serfontein BSc,

    1. Department of Companion Animal Clinical Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Retha Fourie DipVetNur,

    1. Department of Companion Animal Clinical Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Johan P. Schoeman PhD Diplomate ECVIM

    1. Department of Companion Animal Clinical Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa
    Search for more papers by this author

  • Presented in part at the World Veterinary Association Annual Congress, South Africa, 2011; the Veterinary Endoscopic Society Meeting, Utah, USA, 2012; and the South African Veterinary Association, Wildlife Congress, Stone Cradle, South Africa 2012.

Corresponding Author

Marthinus Hartman, BVSc, Department of Companion Animal Clinical Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Soutpan Road, Onderstepoort Veterinary Academic Hospital, Room 4–20, Onderstepoort 0110, South Africa

E-mail: marthinus.hartman@up.ac.za

Abstract

Objective

To describe laparoscopic ovariectomy and salpingectomy in the African lioness (Panthera leo).

Study Design

Descriptive clinical study.

Animals

Female lions (n = 16).

Methods

Lionesses were randomly divided into 2 groups: O = ovariectomy (n = 8) and S = salpingectomy (n = 8) for laparoscopic surgery. Two Veress needle placement techniques were used.

Results

Laparoscopic ovariectomy and salpingectomy were performed without complications. The poorly developed mesosalpinx and ovarian bursa rendered the uterine tube more accessible for salpingectomy compared to the dog making the procedure easier in the lioness. Similarly, salpingectomy is a relatively easier procedure compared with ovariectomy especially when the modified Hasson technique for Veress needle placement is used.

Conclusions

Laparoscopic ovariectomy and salpingectomy can be safely performed in the African lioness.

Ancillary