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Effect of Two Instrument Designs on Laparoscopic Skills Performance

Authors

  • Sabrina L. Barry DVM,

    1. Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences,, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA
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  • Boel A. Fransson DVM PhD Diplomate ACVS,

    Corresponding author
    • Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences,, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA
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  • Benjamin F. Spall DVM,

    1. Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences,, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA
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  • John M. Gay DVM PhD Diplomate ACVPM

    1. Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences,, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA
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  • Work was performed at the Veterinary Applied Laparoscopic Training (VALT) Laboratory, Washington State University, WA.

Corresponding Author

Boel A. Fransson, DVM PhD Dipl ACVS, Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Washington State University, PO Box 646610, Pullman, WA 99164–6610

E-mail: bfransso@vetmed.wsu.edu

Abstract

Objective

To determine whether laparoscopic skills performance is affected by instrument design.

Study Design

Randomized crossover study.

Sample Population

Veterinarians (n = 14) with variable laparoscopic experience.

Methods

Laparoscopic skills performance was assessed with the McGill Inanimate System for Training and Evaluation of Laparoscopic Skills (MISTELS). Participants performed 3 MISTELS tasks twice during 2 sessions (4 tests total). Each set of instruments (set A, B) was used once during each session, and instrument order was switched between the first and second sessions. Surgeons were randomly allocated to either the AB-BA or the BA-AB sequence in a balanced fashion. Scores were compared between instrument sets A and B.

Results

Overall, participants performed better when using set A compared with set B. This difference was most striking in the pattern-cutting task (which used scissors and graspers), less convincing in the peg transfer task (which used 2 graspers), and nonexistent in the ligature loop task (which used 1 grasper and 1 pretied ligature loop).

Conclusions

Laparoscopic skills performance, as assessed by MISTELS testing, is affected by instrument design.

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