The Effect of Short- and Long-Term Treatment with Manuka Honey on Second Intention Healing of Contaminated and Noncontaminated Wounds on the Distal Aspect of the Forelimbs in Horses

Authors

  • Andrea S. Bischofberger Dr Med Vet,

    1. Biomedical Research and Clinical Trials Unit, University Veterinary Teaching Hospital Camden, University of Sydney, Camden, Australia
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  • Christina M. Dart Dr Med Vet Diplomate ACVA,

    Corresponding author
    • Biomedical Research and Clinical Trials Unit, University Veterinary Teaching Hospital Camden, University of Sydney, Camden, Australia
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  • Nigel R. Perkins BVSc, PhD, Diplomate ACT,

    1. Ausvet Animal Health Services, Toowoomba, Australia
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  • Ashley Kelly BAnVetBioSc,

    1. Biomedical Research and Clinical Trials Unit, University Veterinary Teaching Hospital Camden, University of Sydney, Camden, Australia
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  • Leo Jeffcott MA BVetMed DVSc PhD FRCVS,

    1. Biomedical Research and Clinical Trials Unit, University Veterinary Teaching Hospital Camden, University of Sydney, Camden, Australia
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  • Andrew J. Dart BVSc PhD Diplomate ACVS & ECVS

    Corresponding author
    • Biomedical Research and Clinical Trials Unit, University Veterinary Teaching Hospital Camden, University of Sydney, Camden, Australia
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Corresponding Author

Andrew J. Dart, BVSc, PhD, Diplomate ACVS & ECVS, Biomedical Research and Clinical Training Unit, University Veterinary Teaching Hospital, University of Sydney, PMB 4 Narellan Delivery Centre, NSW 2567, Australia

E-mail: andrewd@camden.usyd.edu.au

Abstract

Objectives

To compare the effects of manuka honey and manuka honey gel on second intention healing of noncontaminated distal limb wounds and those contaminated with feces.

Study Design

Experimental study.

Animals

Standardbred horses (n = 10).

Methods

Five full-thickness wounds (2 × 2 cm) were created on both metacarpi. Wounds on 1 forelimb were covered with horse feces for 24 hours. Wounds on the contralateral limb were left uncontaminated. Wounds were assigned to the following 5 different treatments: manuka honey, manuka honey gel or gel applied for 12 days, manuka honey gel applied throughout healing and untreated control. Wound area was measured on day 1 then weekly until day 42 and time to complete healing was recorded.

Results

Wounds treated with manuka honey gel throughout healing healed faster than all other wounds (P < .05). Wounds treated with manuka honey and manuka honey gel for 12 days healed faster than gel control and untreated control wounds (P < .05). Wounds treated with manuka honey and manuka honey gel for 12 days and throughout healing were smaller than gel control and untreated control wounds until day 35 (P < .05). Wounds contaminated with feces had greater retraction for 7 days, but healed faster than noncontaminated wounds (P < .05).

Conclusions

Treatment of wounds with manuka honey and manuka honey gel reduced wound retraction and overall healing time compared with gel and untreated control wounds.

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