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Biomechanical comparison of two implants for the stabilization of incomplete ossification of the humeral condyle lesions in dogs

Authors

  • Jason D. Coggeshall DVM,

    1. Comparative Orthopaedic and Biomechanics Laboratory, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
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  • Daniel D. Lewis DVM, Diplomate ACVS,

    Corresponding author
    1. Comparative Orthopaedic and Biomechanics Laboratory, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
    2. Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
    • Corresponding Author

      Daniel D. Lewis, DVM, Diplomate ACVS, Comparative Orthopaedic and Biomechanics Labratory and Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32608

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  • Noel Fitzpatrick DUniv, MVB, CertSAO, CertVR, Diplomate ACSMR,

    1. Fitzpatrick Referrals, Godalming, Surrey, United Kingdom
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  • Bryan P. Conrad PhD,

    1. Comparative Orthopaedic and Biomechanics Laboratory, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
    2. Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
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  • Katy R. Swanson MS,

    1. Comparative Orthopaedic and Biomechanics Laboratory, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
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  • Stanley E. Kim BVSc, MS, Diplomate ACVS,

    1. Comparative Orthopaedic and Biomechanics Laboratory, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
    2. Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
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  • Lindsey S. Palm,

    1. Comparative Orthopaedic and Biomechanics Laboratory, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
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  • Giovanni Tremolada DMV, PhD,

    1. Comparative Orthopaedic and Biomechanics Laboratory, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
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  • Antonio Pozzi DMV, MS, Diplomate ACVS, Diplomate ACSMR

    1. Comparative Orthopaedic and Biomechanics Laboratory, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
    2. Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
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  • Presented in part at the Veterinary Orthopedic Society Annual Scientific Meeting, Canyons, UT, March 2012.

Abstract

Objective

To compare biomechanical properties of (1) 4.5 mm cortical screws and Fitz Fenestrated Tubular Transcondylar (F2T2) screws; (2) normal humeri and humeri with an intracondylar osteotomy; and (3) humeri with an intracondylar osteotomy stabilized with either a 4.5 mm cortical screw or a F2T2 screw.

Study Design

Cadaveric biomechanical assessment.

Sample Population

4.5 mm cortical screws (n = 10), 5.85 mm F2T2 screws (n = 10), and paired dog humeri (n = 40).

Methods

Cortical and F2T2 screws were loaded to failure in 3-point bending. Ten pairs of humeri with or without an intracondylar osteotomy were axially loaded to failure. Ten additional pairs of humeri with an intracondylar osteotomy were alternately stabilized with a positional cortical or F2T2 screw and axially loaded to failure.

Results

Mean stiffness, yield load, and failure load was significantly greater (P < .001) for the F2T2 screws compared with cortical screws as well as for intact humeri compared with humeri with an intracondylar osteotomy (P < .001). There were no significant differences in mean stiffness (P = .59), yield load (P = .31), or failure load (P = .24) between humeri with stabilized intracondylar osteotomy.

Conclusion

Isolated F2T2 screws have superior mechanical properties to 4.5 mm cortical screws when loaded in 3-point bending. Intracondylar osteotomy adversely affected humeral mechanical integrity. Osteotomized humeri stabilized by either screw had comparable mechanical properties.

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