Herniation of the gravid uterus through a mesoduodenal defect and concurrent omental hernia in a cow

Authors

  • Evelyne Muggli Dr med vet,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Farm Animals, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
    • Corresponding Author

      Dr. med. vet. Evelyne Muggli, Department of Farm Animals, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 260, CH-8057 Zurich, Switzerland. E-mail: emuggli@vetclinics.uzh.ch

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  • Maren Lesser Dr med vet,

    1. Department of Farm Animals, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
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  • Ueli Braun Prof Dr med vet, Diplomate ECBHM,

    1. Department of Farm Animals, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
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  • Karl Nuss Prof Dr med vet, Diplomate ECVS, ECBHM

    1. Department of Farm Animals, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
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Abstract

Objectives

To describe surgical treatment of herniation of the gravid uterus through the mesoduodenum, displacement of the descending duodenum around the gravid uterus, and concurrent herniation of the small and large intestines into the omental bursa in a cow.

Study Design

Clinical report.

Animal

Three-year-old, five-month-pregnant Swiss Braunvieh cow.

Methods

Repositioning of the displaced uterus and descending duodenum without transection and anastomosis of the duodenum was performed through a right flank laparotomy. Concurrent displacement of a large portion of the small and large intestines into the omental bursa was not associated with intestinal strangulation and was corrected manually. The defects in the omentum and mesoduodenum were sutured.

Results

There were no postoperative complications, and the cow was healthy at discharge from the clinic 1 week after surgery. Telephone follow-up revealed that the cow had delivered a live calf and was producing a normal amount of milk. The cow was slaughtered 14 months after the surgery because of an udder problem.

Conclusions

Herniation of the gravid uterus through a tear in the mesoduodenum with subsequent displacement of the descending duodenum around the uterus combined with internal omental herniation caused nonspecific clinical signs and no ileus. Exploratory laparotomy in an early stage of pregnancy facilitated reduction of the displaced uterus without transection of the descending duodenum.

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