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The Advanced Locking Plate System (ALPS): A Retrospective Evaluation in 71 Small Animal Patients

Authors

  • Tomás G. Guerrero PD Dr. med vet, Diplomate ECVS,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department for Small Animal Surgery, Vetsuisse Faculty University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
    2. Small Animal Medicine and Surgery Academic Program, School of Veterinary Medicine, St. George's University, Grenada, West Indies
    • Corresponding Author

      Dr. Tomás G. Guerrero, Diplomate ECVS, Small Animal Medicine and Surgery Academic Program, School of Veterinary Medicine, St. George's University, True Blue, Grenada, West Indies.

      E-mail: tguerrero@sgu.edu

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  • Karin Kalchofner Dr. med vet, Diplomate ECVAA,

    1. Small Animal Medicine and Surgery Academic Program, School of Veterinary Medicine, St. George's University, Grenada, West Indies
    2. Section Anesthesiology, Equine Department, Vetsuisse Faculty University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
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  • Nicole Scherrer Dr. med vet,

    1. Department for Small Animal Surgery, Vetsuisse Faculty University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
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  • Patrick Kircher Dr. med vet PhD, Diplomate ECVD

    1. Division of Diagnostic Imaging, Vetsuisse Faculty University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
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Abstract

Objective

To evaluate use of the Advanced Locking Plate System (ALPS) in dogs and cats and report outcome.

Study Design

Retrospective case series.

Animals

Dogs (n = 29) and cats (n = 42).

Methods

The medical records (April 2007–April 2010) of dogs and cats treated with ALPS were reviewed evaluated. Data retrieved included signalment, indication for surgery, complications, and outcome.

Results

ALPS was used for 54 fractures, 12 tarsal or carpal ligament injuries and in 6 cases, to prevent or treat fractures during total hip replacement. Complications needing revision surgery occurred in 4 cases (5.5%): fixation failure was identified in 3 (2 fracture-fixations, 1 pancarpal arthrodesis), and a fracture occurred through a screw hole. The most common complication after tarsal arthrodesis was suture dehiscence. All cases had healed by study end.

Conclusions

ALPS offers a reliable alternative for fracture treatment and some other orthopedic conditions in small animals.

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