Extensive Rostral Mandibulectomy for Treatment of Ameloblastoma in a Horse

Authors

  • Jose L. Mendez-Angulo DVM, MS, Diplomate ACVS,

    Corresponding author
    1. Veterinary Population Medicine Department, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota
    • Corresponding Author

      Dr. Jose L. Mendez-Angulo, DVM, MS, Diplomate ACVS, Veterinary Teaching Hospital, University of Córdoba, Campus de Rabanales, Crtra Madrid-Cádiz Km 396, 14014 Córdoba, Spain. E-mail: v12meanj@uco.es

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  • Dane M. Tatarniuk DVM,

    1. Veterinary Population Medicine Department, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota
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  • Indalecio Ruiz DVM, PhD,

    1. Department of Animal Medicine and Surgery, University of Córdoba, Córdoba, Spain
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  • Nicolas Ernst DVM, MS, Diplomate ACVS

    1. Veterinary Population Medicine Department, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota
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Abstract

Objective

To report long-term outcome in a mare that had extensive rostral mandibulectomy to remove an ameloblastoma.

Study Design

Clinical report.

Animals

A 21-year-old mare.

Methods

An ameloblastoma, located in the rostral aspect of the mandible, was removed by complete en-bloc resection of the tumor, removing most of the mandibular symphysis.

Results

The day after surgery, the remaining mandibular symphysis (<5 mm) fractured causing marked instability of the hemi-mandibles. Partial wound dehiscence occurred 5 days after surgery; however, the mare was able to eat well and the incision healed within 2 weeks. At 18 months, there was bony fusion of the hemi-mandibles and mild protrusion of the tongue.

Conclusion

Extensive rostral mandibulectomy (up to the caudal edge of the mandibular symphysis) can apparently be performed in a horse without internal or external stabilization, and yield a cosmetic and functional outcome.

Ancillary