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Headshaking in 5 Horses After Paranasal Sinus Surgery

Authors

  • William F. Gilsenan VMD, Diplomate ACVIM,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Blacksburg, Virginia
    • Corresponding Author

      William F. Gilsenan, VMD, Diplomate ACVIM, Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Phase II, Duckpond Drive, Blacksburg, VA 24061.

      E-mail: gilsenanw@gmail.com

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  • Liberty M. Getman DVM, Diplomate ACVS,

    1. Tennessee Equine Hospital, Thompsons Station, Tennessee
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  • Eric J. Parente DVM, Diplomate ACVS,

    1. Department of Clinical Studies, New Bolton Center, University of Pennsylvania, School of Veterinary Medicine, Kennett Square, Pennsylvania
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  • Amy L. Johnson DVM, Diplomate ACVIM

    1. Department of Clinical Studies, New Bolton Center, University of Pennsylvania, School of Veterinary Medicine, Kennett Square, Pennsylvania
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  • Work at New Bolton Center, University of Pennsylvania, Kennett Square, PA and at the Cornell University Hospital for Animals, Ithaca, NY.
  • The authors report no financial or other conflicts related to this report.

Abstract

Objective

To report headshaking and presumptive trigeminal neuritis as a potential complication after paranasal sinus surgery in horses.

Study Design

Retrospective case series.

Animals

Horses (n = 5) that developed headshaking within 45 days of paranasal sinus surgery.

Methods

Medical records (2007–2010) of horses that had been evaluated for headshaking after paranasal sinus surgery were reviewed.

Results

Of 5 horses that developed headshaking within 45 days of paranasal sinus surgery, resolution occurred after treatment in 2 horses. One horse was euthanatized because clinical signs associated with headshaking could not be controlled. Headshaking persisted in the other 2 horses but was either adequately controlled with analgesics or was considered infrequent and transient enough to not warrant therapeutic intervention. Only 2 of 5 horses returned to full work after development of headshaking.

Conclusions

Headshaking because of presumptive trigeminal neuritis is a possible career-ending or fatal complication of paranasal sinus surgery in horses.

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