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STRUCTURAL INTEGRATION AND THE TREES: An Analysis of Deforestation in Less-Developed Countries, 1990–2005

Authors

  • Andrew K Jorgenson

    Corresponding author
    1. North Carolina State University
      *Andrew K. Jorgenson, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, North Carolina State University, Campus Box 8107, Raleigh, NC 27695-9107; e-mail: akjorgen@chass.ncsu.edu
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*Andrew K. Jorgenson, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, North Carolina State University, Campus Box 8107, Raleigh, NC 27695-9107; e-mail: akjorgen@chass.ncsu.edu

Abstract

This study tests a hypothesis derived from an expanded theory of foreign investment dependence. The tested hypothesis states that less-developed countries with higher levels of primary sector foreign investment exhibit greater rates of deforestation. Findings for cross-national analyses of deforestation from 1990 to 2005 for 40 less-developed countries confirm the hypothesis, providing support for the proposed theorization. Additional results indicate that the presence of environmental international nongovernmental organizations is beneficial for natural forest areas, while population growth is a key driver of deforestation in less-developed countries. Besides confirming the hypothesis, this research underscores the importance for sociologists to consider both political–economic forms of integration and human-ecological factors when investigating how humans impact the environment.

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